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LIBRARY 



PRESENTED BY 



The Class of 1922 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2012 with funding from 

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hil 



http://archive.org/details/muse1922sain 



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PUBLISHED BY 



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Volume JEtoentii = Jfour 
1922 

ST MARY'S 30HOOL LI8SA8Y 
Cfjc gear JSoob of the 

jtuDcnts; of ££>t. JWarp'g ^>cf)ool 
i&aleiglj, iJortf) Carolina 







- 



PRESSES OF 
EDWARDS a BROLIGHTON PRIf 



LEIGH. N. C. 



Jforetoorti 

(Trustimi tljat it hiill imi fall tun far 
short of the stmioarn set by the 
authors nf its predecessors in bring 
somrtl|ino, of pleasure ann benefit tn 
its rcaoers; ann hutlj the Ijnpe that 
tljc sljortrommqs of tljis nefa iffliTsc 
IBaaro tnill be leniently oealt hiith, 
ftte present lifts near bonk of ^t. 
^Mary/s Jitfyrol, ttje t&rentg-fourirj 
unlnmc nf '(Tlie ( J8tuse 



13 2,6 + 



&lma Jflater 



Tune: ''Believe Me if All Those Endearing Young Charms.' 

St. Mary's! wherever thy daughters may be 

They love thy high praises tn sing, 
Ami tell of thy beauties of campus and tree 

Around which sweel memories ding; 
They may wander afar, oul of reacli of thy name, 

Afar, out of sight of thy grove, 
Bui the thought of St. .Mary's aye kindles a flame 

( If sweet recollections and love. 

Beloved St. "Mary's! bow great is our debt! 

Thou hast cared for thy daughters full well; 
They can never thy happy instructions forget, 

Nor fail of thy virtues to tell. 
The love thai they feel is a heritage pure; 

An experience wholesome and sweet. 
Through fast rolling years it will grew and endure; 

1 >e a lamp and a guide to their feet. 

May the future unite all the good ol the past 
With the best thai new knowledge can bring. 

Ever onward and upward thy course ! To the hist 
Be thou steadfast in every good thing. 

Generations to come may thy fair daughters still 
Fondly think on thy halls and thy grove 

And carry thy leaching o'er w Hand and hill — 

Of earnestness, wisdom and love. 



H. E. H., 1905 



3To 
Jflfttss illi=5tc JHuttnn Thin* 

tuhu nuriuu, tlje years she lias been at £$L jdffitarw's, f|as pruti- 

e£) a true friiuib tn her Alma JUlaier, auit a sympathetic 

^Mother to each snrceeoinq, rlass of "^nuur 

rhtlbreu" tl]e class of 1122 affectionately 

bebicates lifts tmeuty-fmuth tuilume 

ai <Elie .ill use for tfje 

jit. ^ary's girls of 

1321 - 1922 







MISS LIZZIE HINTON LEE 






tLliis page is rcscrfrca to express again the lour 
and loyalty, of earl] aito cueru ^t. ffiat^s gtrl 
to ttno frterros, uilui until this gear tja&e hern for so 
laitg ae&oiea artfc untiring tuorkcrs in the interests 
of ilje school; ano fuljosc absence iliis pernor 
(Class of HNaueteeit tjmtbreb ano tluentu - turn has 
keen first calico art keenly to feel anb reqret; 

JHr_ auu JHrs. iffrnrst (Criuhslimtk 




Past and Present 




The original of the "Stage Coach Picture," so often used in The Muse to contrast the 
old days with the later ones, whs a drawing by Mrs. Gustave Blessner. Mr. Blessner, 
Musical Director at St. Mary's in the '40's, had it lithographed for use on the cover of 
some waltzes which he composed and had published in 1845. On the title page of the 
music, in addition to the Stage Coach Picture, was printed: "The Flowers of the South: 
A Collection of Characteristic Waltzes, composed for the piano, and Dedicated to the 
Young Ladies of St. Mary's School. Raleigh. N. C. by Gustave Blessner." 



ST. MARY'S ALUMNAE ASSOCIATION 

OFFICERS. 1921-22. 

President Mrs. W. W. Robards, Sanford 

Vice-President Miss Susan Iden. Raleigh 

Secretary Miss Kate McKi mmon. Raleigh 

Assistant Secretary Miss Louise Busbee, Raleigh 

Treasurer Mrs. W. A. Withers. Raleigh 



ALUMNAE COUNCIL 

Mrs. J. .1. Bernard Raleigh, N. C, until 1922 

Miss Florence Slater New York City, until 1922 

Miss Anxie S. Cameron Hillsboro, N. C.. until 1923 

Mrs. J. M. MURFREE Raleigh, N. C... until 1923 

Mrs. W. A. Ekwin Raleigh, N. C, until 1924 

Miss Sara Chesire Raleigh, N. C. until 1924 



terototng Up Wit\) B>t. fflaxp* 



April 1 .'. 1850 — Today Dr. Smedes sent for Claudia Wingate and Mittie 
Saunders, and told them they were to go to Mr. Hart's studio, this afternoon. 
.Mr. 1 1 ; i ft is painting a picture For Dr. Smedes of Bishop Ives — it is rumored 
to defray the expenses of tuition ol < Haudia who is ;i near relative of his. Of 
course we have been very much excited over it. and are waiting patiently for 

them tn come back ;nid tell us whal 
Mr. Hart wanted with them. 

Some til the girls are in the par- 
lor dancing the polkas, and square 
dances. And some who like mor ■ 
athletic amusements are in the 
grove playing ball. This is ;i great 
di al of fun. The girls are divided 
iiitu two parts. The ball, a large 
India t libber one, is thrown into 
the air, ere it touches the ground 
nne of the girls catches it on her 
fool and kicks it. yes, kicks it with 
all her strength, to the other side; 
tin y ret urn it in the same manner, 
die object is no1 to let it touch the 
I'Tniinil. 

( 'himlia ami Mitt ie have just 
I ■! nvnei. of course I stopped my 
diarv lona enough to hud out what 
thev did. Anil what do you think '. 
Mr. Hart has ashed Mittie in he in the picture. The middle girl is to he im- 
aginarv, and Mittie is tn he knei ling next on the right, to her. Dr. Smedes is to 
choose the other girl, oh. bow I wish he would choose me. 

.Inst think we are to have a new chape] soon, a real one. not just a room 
down stairs in East Rock House, hut I don't believe we will ever love it near 

a- well as we do the one wo have now. in I'aisl Rock 1 louse. 

\\'i II. little diarv, I must leave von now ami in to write niv '"abstract." 




49 













REV. ALDERT SMEDES, D. D., 1810-18 



Founder (18Jf2) and First Rector (18J$-1811) of St. Mary's School. 

At the time of the death of Dr. Smedes a tribute was paid to his memory by the 
Bishop in these words: "I take this occasion to express publicly, as my judgment, that 
Dr. Smedes accomplished more for the advancement of the church in this Diocese, 
and for the promotion of the best interests of society within its limits, than any 
other man who ever lived in it. Under his care, and very much as the result of his 
intelligence, his lirmness, and his tender affection for them, there went out from St. 
Mary's School, Raleigh, every year a number of young girls who, in culture, in re- 
finement, and still more in elevation of moral and religious character, would compare 
favorably with the pupils of any other institution in this country. He knew not 
only how to teach, but how to govern, and to make himself honored as well as loved, 
and to constrain his pupils to feel that the years spent under his care were at the 
same time the happiest and most useful of their lives. lie has gone to his reward, 
but his work remains, and will remain from generation to generation." 



Haywood's "Bishops of North Carolina." page 198. 






November /. tSUO — I haven't written to you in a long time, little diary. So many 
things have happened and we have had such good times lately. A few nights ago we 
went to the Hallowe'en party and oh, it was so much fun! We all shrieked as we 

shook hands with the wet kid glove filled 
with saw dust, nearly ruined ourselves 
"bobbing" for apples, had our fortunes 
told by dark, very familiar gypsies, and 
danced merrily the Shaker dance. I think 
Hallowe'en party is the best of all! Yes- 
terday when Mr. Pence brought in the 
express there was a wonderful box from 
home for the Haveners. They invited all 
their friends to a party and I have never 
seen such a box! Turkey, home-cured 
ham, beaten biscuits, so crisp and good, 
cakes and pickled oysters. We all help- 
ed ourselves and feasted like kings. 

Last Saturday morning after our beds 
were made and our alcoves dusted, we 
were all sitting around the big dormitory 
stove. Of course we knew we should not 
but this day we were so hungry, so we 
toasted cheese and broiled steak on the 
top of the stove. The cheese was an es- 
pecial offense, because Miss Katie de- 
tests mice. 




'November 12, ttiOl — Diary dear, every- 
one is in the parlor dancing but I think 
I'll do penance by writing to you. To- 
night at Roll Call I had two punctuality 
marks to report. Wasn't that dreadful? 
And this morning I forgot to bring my 
shawl to Main Building; so when walking 
hour came. I had to get permission to go 
over to McKimmonsville and get it. I 
guess it's the worry over "The Weekly 
News" that makes me so forgetful. The 
Duplicator has been behaving so badly 
and Kate and I have green ink all over 
our hands. 

Tomorrow I have to practice for the 
play. Miss Slater says I must learn my 
lines, too, for "The Ravs" are coming 
soon and we want to have the play when 
they are here. How everyone looks for- 
ward to their visits! It must be nice to 
be an old girl. 

Diary, I am going to study hard so 
that I can soon be a Senior. Dearest Miss 
Battle reads "The Mill on the Floss" and 

Browning to them. She is so sweet and frail that I pray for her each time we go to 
chapel. I belong to the society of St. Chrysostom now. We are trying to avoid slang 
and other faults of speech for that is our aim, and Miss Battle's wish. 










January i>. W10 — Dear Diary: Here we are back at school again 
coming back on the train that I nearly ruined my new feather boa- 
Lhat would have been! And they made us go to Chapel as soon as 
didn't even have time to take oft" our hats; and Mr. 
Owen showed how tactless he could be by playing 
the saddest piece on the organ. I just know he 
must have sat up all night going through the 
hymn hook, 'cause he couldn't have found a more 
doleful one, most inconsiderate was it not? 

They've already started gym in the parlor. I 
just know we're going to take such violent exer- 
cises one of these days that all the old portraits 
will come tumbling down. This morning we were 
running around when suddenly we heard an aw- 
ful crash right below us. We had shaken a whole 
lot of strawberry jam jars off the pantry shelf 
below! Strawberry jam of all things! I don't 
see why it couldn't have been canned beans instead. 

We had more fun last night, Diary Dear. We 
had a lovely marshmallow roast over the gas jets 
in Miss Sutton's dormitory. She's a perfect dear 
for pretending not to smell them, when we all 
knew she couldn't help it. 

The old eyes won't stay open any longer — so 
goodnight, Dear Diary — Goodnight. 



I we 

-what 
we got 



pt so hard 
a calamity 
here. We 





April ■'>. 1922 — Dear Diary: What a time I have 
been having! Seems as if I get into all the trou- 
ble a person possibly could get into. In fact, I've 
had an awful day, if you know what I mean, sweet 
Diary! To begin with, Nancy and I didn't wake 
up till 7:26 (I'm sure it couldn't have been ear- 
lier) and of course there was no timepiece around 
to tell us just how fast the morning was speeding 
by. (Our clock never runs somehow. I don't 
know why. ) Being too lazy and sleepy, both of 
us, to get up and inquire into the matter, we 
spent two or three minutes yelling at the top of 
our lungs, "What time is it?" Some kind soul 
finally rewarded our efforts and told us it was 
time for the bell — just as the hell rang! Oh, we 
were miserable! I'm afraid you can't understand. 
Friend Diary. Nancy had to twist her hair into 
some kind of a knot — she was furious because she 
didn't have time to tangle it even a little bit — 
and I gave mine two or three hangs with the brush 
(I'm so thankful it's bobbed sometimes), and we 
were oft"! Not forgetting, of course, a few neces- 
sary details, such as powder on our noses, and 
things like that . We were late! You must have guessed it before this. Diary — you're 
quite quickwitted at times. Besides you're used to me and my troubles. So you see, 
Dear Diary, I'm in a fierce humor. I had a hard time even calling you that sweet name. 






OTfjen ffli$& Katie toa£ a QTeenp little (girl 

St. Mary's was a youngster, not a venerable < >1< ! dear, 

When Miss Katie was a teeny little girl; 
Dr. Aldert Smedes, the Founder, was a living presence here, 

When Miss Katie was a teeny little girl. 
His forceful personality, his eloquence ami charm, 
His loving care which sheltered, as it were, his girls from harm. 
Gave a sense of sweet protection free from outside world's alarm — 

When Miss Katie was a teeny little girl. 

Our Confirmation Grandmas used to pull each other's curls. 

When Miss Katie was a teeny little girl ; 
For even in the '."ill's, girls, yon know, were only girls — 

When Miss Katie was a teeny little girl. 
The stage coach rolling through the Grove caused then a great to-do. 
The small front porch was full of girls — I fear the windows too; 
You'd hear .Madam Clement's pupils most politely parlez-vous — 

When Miss Katie was a teeny little girl. 

The traditions of St. Mary's were hut being formed, you know, 

When Miss Katie was a teeny little girl ; 
The precept and example of the Founder made them so, 

When Miss Katie was a teeny little girl ; 
His teachers and his pupils cherished deep his high ideal. 
Their successors to the present strive to keep that ideal real ; 
To all who love St. Mary's those days make deep appeal — 

When Miss Katie was a teeny little girl. 



E. C, 1920 







MISS KATE MrKIMMON 



,< 



"Constant as the Northern star. 

Of whose true, fix'd, and resting Quality 

There is no fellow in the firmament." 



Miss Kate McKimmon, known affectionately as "Miss Katie" to all St. Mary's girls, 
is this year in her fifty-fifth year of devoted service to the school. 

Entering as a little girl in 1SG7, from pupil she became teacher, and continued teach- 
ing without interruption until 1919. 

As "Dormitory Mother" she won the hearts of her girls for many years, and her 
work for, and in the Chapel has been a very special part of her. 

An unreconstructed Southerner but loyal American, wholehearted in her devotion to 
school and to Church. St. Mary's would hardly seem St. Mary's without "Miss Katie." 



Fifteen 







<&ranuuaugljtrrs> ano threat ^ranbbaugfjters 
of §s>t. jUarp's 

Colors: Light Blue and White 
Motto: Lest We Forget Song: 1///'/ Lang Syne 

Flower: Pansy 

Maejoeie Willard President 

Addie Huske Vice-President 

Doeotii'y Nixon Secretary 

Daisy Strong Cooper, of Oxford Mary Louise ('<>i i hi;. of Winston Salem 

d. of Julia Horner, of Oxford ad. of Emma Knight of Wilmington 

Susan Divine, of Wilmington Maber Hawkins, of Jacksonville, Fla. 

d. of Susan Lane Hardin, of Wilming- gd - uf Eliza c - Landon, of Pittsboro 

ton Elizauetb Hickerkon, of Ronda 

d. of Sara Lenoir, of Lenoir 
Mary Gale, of Jackson, Miss. 

ggd. of -Mary Gale of Louisiana Ainai: Huske, of Fayetteville 

d. of Addie B. Riddick, of Fayetteville 
Kate Giddens. of Norfolk, Va. 
gd. of Mary B. Pugh, of Pitt County L " v KlJIBALL ' ° £ Henderson 

ggd. of Lucy Hawkins 
Josephine Harris, qt Rocky Mount go", of Lucy Henderson 

il. of Bel] Gulley, of Raleigh d, of Lucy Plummer, of Middleburg 

Sixteen 




THE "GRANDDAUGHTERS" OF 1921-1022 



Lucy Kittrell, of Henderson 
gd. of Lucy Cruddup, of Kittrell 

Dorothy Nixon, of Hertford 
gd. of Isa Gordon, of Hertford 
gd. of Cornelia Townsend, of Hertford 

Marjorie Nixon, of Hertford 
gd. of Isa Gordon, of Hertford 
gd. of Cornelia Townsend, of Hertford 

Charlotte Rodman, of Washington 
gd. of Charlotte Bryan, of Raleigh 
d. of Theodora Grimes, of Grimesland 

Elizabeth Rose, of Henderson 

gd. of Elizabeth Bryan, of Henderson 

Pauline Taylor, of Pittstaoro 
gd. of Sara McClenahan, of Pittsboro 



Isa Gordon Tucker, of Plymouth 
gd. of Isa Gordon, of Hertford 

Evelyn Tyson, of Carthage 
Jesse Dawson, of Halifax County 

Macon Walters, of Raleigh 

d. of Laura Faison, of Raleigh 

Elizabeth Webb, of Wadesboro 
gd. of Mary Wright, of Edenton 

Marjorie Willard. of Wilmington 
d. of Mary West, of Wilmington 

Virginia Williamson, of Burlington 
gd. of Ida Manly, of Tarboro 

Mary E. Yarborough, of Raleigh 
gd. of Catherine Clements, of Raleigh 
d. of Martha Ellis, of Raleigh 







THE RT. REV. JOSEPH BLOUNT CHESHIRE, D.D. 
Bishop of North Carol tun 

President of the Board of Trustees of St. Mary's and Chairman of the Executive 
Committee from the Purchase of the School by the Church in 1SII7 to the present time. 



^fje ^Poarb of tErusitees 



& 



THE BISHOPS 

Rt. Rev. Joseph Blount Cheshire, D. D. Chairman Raleigh, N. C. 

Rt. Rev. la. Alexander Gueeky, D. D Charleston, S. C. 

Rt. Rev. Junius M. Horner, D. D Asheville. N. C. 

Rt. Rev. Thus C. Darst, D. D Wilmington. N. C. 

Rt. Rev. Kikman G. Fini.ay. D. D Columbia, S. C. 



CLERICAL AM) LAY TRUSTEES 

NORTH CAROLINA 

Rev. Milton A. Barber, Raleigh Rev. Julian E. Ingle, Raleigh 

Rev. Isaac W. Hughes, Henderson Dr. Richard H. Lewis, Raleigh 

Col. Chas. E. Johnson, Raleigh Mr. Graham Andrews, Raleigh 

Mr. W. A. Erwin, Durham Mil. Thomas H. Battle, Rocky Mount 
(Until 1927) (Until 1924) 

EAST CAROLINA 
Rev. Robert B. Dram;. D. D., Edenton Rev. George F. Hill, Elizabeth City 

Mr. Wm. D. MacMillan. Wilmington Mr. George C. Royall, Goklsboro 

(Until 1927) (Until 1924) 

SOUTH CAROLINA 
Rev. Thomas T. Walsh, Yorkville Rev. S. Carey Beckwith. Charleston 

Dh. Wm. Egleston. Hartsville Mr, T. W. Bacot. Charleston 

(Until 1923) 

ASHEVILLE 
Hon. Wm. A. Hoke, Lincolnton Rev. H. Norwood Bowse. Tryon 

Ven. John H. Griffith, Asheville Mil. W. D. Anderson, Gastonia 

(Until 1923) (Until 1922) 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

Rt. Rev. Joseph B. Cheshire, D. 1)., Chairman 

Col. Ciias. E. Johnson Dr. Richard H. Lewis 

Hon. William A. Hoke Mr. George C. Royall 

Rev. Isaac W. Hughes 

SECRETARY AND TREASURER 
Dr. Kemp P. Battle. Jr. Raleigh, N. C. 

COMMITTEE ON RAISING THE BUILDING AND ENDOWMENT FUND 

Rev. Isaac W. Hughes, Chairman 

Mr. George C. Royall Mr. Graham H. Andrews 








Till': .SCHOOL 



Sail, *t. jlarp'S 



In a grove of stately oak trees, 

Where the sunlight lies. 
Stands St. Mary's true and noble, 

'Neath tlic Southern skies. 

Far and wide, 'ill sound her praises, 
( 'horns full and free. 

Hail. St. Mary's, Alma Mater, 
Hail, all hail to thee ! 

Well we love the little chapel, 

Ever hold it dear ; 
Hear the echoes of the music, 

Rising soft and clear, 

Far and wide. etc. 

There the ivy and iho roses 

Climb the old stone wall, 
There the sweet, enticing bird notes 

Sound their magic call. 
Far and wide, etc. 

And the bonds of friendship strengthen 

As her beam ies charm, 
We draw close to Alma Mater, 

Trust her guiding arm. 
Far and wide, etc. 



Adapted from Margaret Mason Young, 1S99. 



Twenty-one 






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';-;. 



,-. ■ 





THE REV. WARREN WADE WAY 
Sixth Rector of St. Mary's School WIS. 



TWENTY-FOIK 







Miss Bkrtiia A. Mobgan 
Lady Principal 1922 



Miss Sara C. Ti-rner 
Academic Hvml 1922 




TWENTY-riVE 



FACULTY AXD OFFICERS, L921-22. 

Rev. Warres \V. Way Rector 

iliss Bertha A. Morgan Lady Principal 

Miss Sara ('. Turner icademic II cud 

Albert W. Tucker Secretary and Business Manager 



THE ACADEMIC DEPARTMENT 

Rev. Warren W. Way Bible and Ethics 

A.B., Hobart College; General Theological Seminary 

Sara Clarke Turner English 

All. Goucher; MA, Columbia. 

William Enos Stoke History anil Political Science 

All.. Harvard. 

Frances Ranney Bottum Science 

Graduate St, Mary's; B.S., Peabody College for Teachers 

Nancy I. Moorefiklii Mathematics 

A.B., Randolph-Macon; MA, Columbia. 

Grace Evans St. John English 

A 11 , Barnard College. 

Natalie Ballou French 

A.B., Roanoke; Johns Hopkins. 

Marguerite E. Kretschmer Latin 

A.B., Vassar. 

Susan Reavis Cooke English 

I'll 1'., University of Chicago. 

Margaret Scofield Cummings Spanish ami French 

All. Radcliffe College. 

Florence C. Davis Elocution 

B.O., Emerson College. 

Makion S. Hesse Physical Director 

Graduate Posse Normal School, Boston. 

♦Mildred Morgan English 

A.B., Vassar; M.A., Columbia University. 

* Second half-year. 













Twenty-seven 



JHusic department 

William H. Jones. A. A. G. O. Director Piano. Organ, Voice, Theory 

AH, Trinity College; Berlin. 

Sue Kyle Southwick Piano, Theory 

Graduate New England Conservatory, 

Elsie A. Fox Piano. Theory 

i B.Mus., Syracuse University. 

E-ble Roberts ■ I'iano. Theory 

Pupil of Brawley, Owen; Burroughs Method 

Anne W. Weeks Voice 

University of California; Florence and .Milan, Italy. 

*Ethel May Abbott Piano 

New York Conservatory; Peaoody Conservatory. 



&rt department 

Clara I. Penneb Director 

Maryland Institute; Pratt Institute; Paris. 



€xpre£#ton department 



Florence C. Dayis Director 

B.C., Emerson College; Leland Powers Method. 



^usitnegs! department 



Lizzie H. Lee Director 

Isaae Pittman Shorthand. 

Home economics; department 

Flora Mathison Domestic Science. Domestic Art 

B.S., Teachers College, Columbia Lniversity, 

♦Constance Moffat Domestic Science, Domestic Art 

US. Teachers College, Columbia University. 



Officers 1921-22 



Rev. Warren W. Way Rector 

Miss Beiitiia A. Morgan Lady Principal 

Miss Kate McKimmon Special Supervisor 

Miss Katie L. Giddens Librarian 

Mrs. Nannie H. Marriott Dietitian 

Miss Florence W. Talbot Housekeeper 

Miss Annie D. Alexander, R. N Matron of the Infirmary 

Dit. A. W. Knox School Physician 

Albert W. Tucker Business Manager 

Miss Juliet B. Sutton Secretary to the Rector 

Miss Catherine P. Brooks Office Secretary 

* Second half-year. 



Twenty-eight 







Twenty-nine 




SCHOOL COUNCIL 



&fje ^>cfjool Council 



The School Council was instituted by the rector at the beginning of the ses- 
sion of 1919-20. 

It is made u|i of the Rector, the Lady Principal, the Academic Head, three 
representatives of the Faculty and eleven representatives of the students — four 
Seniors, three Jimiors, two Sophomores, our Freshman, and one member of 
the Preparatory Department. 

Meetings are held as desired. 

The membership of the Council in lU'21-22 has been: 



The Rector, rjnuinmn 

Miss McKimmon 

.Miss Morgan 

.Miss Davis 

Mu. Stone 

Miss Bottom 

Miss Turner 

M \uv Louise Everett 

Helen Budge 



Louise Egleston 
Josephine Forbes 
Lucille Dempsey 
Evelyn Way 
Van Cleve Wilkins 
Aiiimi; Husk 
Lucy Lay 
Lou Harrison 
Mabel Hawkins 




The Classes 




fr 




M.^ 



M.JStt 



«^agfe^y^^j^iiife^-^^j^^ 



he Class Pgehi 



For you, () shady grove, little chapel; 

For you, () stately oak frees, well known ways; 
For yon, () hill white columns, writ in mem'ry 

( In other hearts, thru countless by-gone clays; 
For all that keeps our faith in yen, St. Mary's — 

Our loyalty alive in every heart — 
With lips that frame a word of vain regretting, 

We breathe our love, our thanks before we part. 

For you, our friend,-, who every year have labored 

To make us all we are or hope to be, 
We leave a word in deep appreciation 

Of constant care and service, full ami free! 
But most of all to you, dear fellow classmates, 

And you, St. Mary's girls who every day 
Have won our fullest measure of devotion — 

We leave that love which lips can never say! 




Thikty-one 








HEHIILE ! 
THE SENIOHS 



'••",) *' frj iv y, \w\ \v : 

"'••I 

Colors: Black and Gold Flower: Black-Eyed Susan 

Motto: "Climb, tho the rocks be rugged.'' 

CLASS OFFICERS 

M any Louise Everett /'resident 

Frances Hosklns Vice-President 

Hilda Tuerentine Secretary 

Mary Wiatt Yarboroi gu Treasurer 

I.kxoke Powell Prophet 

Loi ise Egleston Poet 

Muriel Dougherty Historian 

Elizabeth Lawrence Testator 

REPRESENTATIVES ON THE SCHOOL COUNCIL 
Helen Budge Louise Egleston Mary Louise Everett Josephine Forbes 

CLASS ROLL 
Julia Winston Ashworth, Selma 

Evelina Gilbert Beckwith, Lumberton 

Helen Porter Budge, Miami, Fla. 

Elizabeth Warwick Cheek, Henderson 

Muriel Daugherty, Washington. D, C. 

Louise Aiken Egleston, Hartsville, S. C. 

Mary Louise Everett, Rockingham 
Susan Virginia Fitchett, Cape Charles, Va. 
Josephine Lewis Forbes, Tarboro 
Kitty Lee Frazier. Raleigh 

Eva Lee Fairbanks Glass, Sewanee, Tenn. 

Prances Springer Hoskins, East Las Vegas. N. M. 
Mary Louise Harding. Greenville 

Elizabeth Lawrence, Raleigh 

Dorothy Gordon Nixon, Hertford 
Lenore Christine Powell, Jacksonville. Fla. 

Minnettk Gordon Thompson. Jacksonville 
Hilda Grace Turrentine. Kinston 

Eugene Marion Wise. Lincolnton 
Josephine Mann Rose. Henderson 

Dariel Woodeson, Raleigh 

Mary Wiatt Yarborough, Louisburg 
Class Adviser: Mr. Stone 

Thirty-two 












Julia Winston Ash worth 

SELMA, IV. C. 

(1920-21-22) 

Mu, Sigma Lambda, Blue Ridge Delegate '20, 
Manager Mil volley ball '21. Commencement 
Marshal '21, President Mu '22. First team Mu 
'22. President St. Agnes '22 Annual Muse 
Board '22, Pan-Archon Council '22, Altar Guild. 

•'.so mild, so merciful, in strong, so good. 
So patient, peaceful, loyal, loving, pure." 



Evelyn Gilbert Beckwith 

LUMBERTON, X. C. 

(1020-21-22) 

Mu, B. A. P.. President E. A. P. '22, vice pres- 
ident B. A. P. '21, Commencement marshal '21, 
Chairman Junior Auxiliary council '22. Pres- 
ident St. Anne's '22, Sect. & Treas. St. Anne's 
'21, Muse Club '21. Choral Club '20-21-22, Pan- 
Archon Council '22, Altar Guild. 

A perfect woman, nobly planned 
To warm, to comfort and command. 




Thirty three 







Helen Poeteb Budge 

M IAMI, FLA. 

(1918-19-20-21-22) 

Sigma, Sigma Lambda, Muse Club '20 Treas. 
Red Cross '20, Chairman Red Cross '21, Sect. 
Red Cross '22. Sect. St. Elizabeth '20, Pres. 
St. Catherines '22, School Council '22, Chapel 
Warden '22, Domestic Science Certf. '21, Pan- 
Archon Council "22, Asst. Business manager 
Muse *21, Chairman Muse '22, Altar Guild. 

And those around her, from her shall learn 
The perfect ways of honor. 



Elizabeth Warwick ( 'iikek 

HENDERSON, N. C. 

(1921-22) 

E. A. P., Mu, Custodian Banner, Altar guild. 

blest irith temper whose unclouded rait. 
Can make tomorrow cheerful as today. 



Thirty-four 






MrciEi. Dougherty 

WASHINGTON, D. C. 

(1916-17-18-19-20-21-22) 

.Mu, Sigma Lambda, Muse Club '19-'20-'21, Dra- 
matic Club '21-'22. Choral Club '20-'21, Altai- 
Guild, Vice pres. class '20, Student Council '20- 
'21, treas. Red Cross '20,-'21-'22, Sect. Sigma 
Lambda '22, Sect.-treas. St. Monica '22, An- 
nual Muse Board '21-'22, Class Historian '22, 
Chapel Warden '21-'22. 

Age cannot wither her, nor custom 
Stale her infinite variety. 



Louise Aiken Egleston 

hartsville, s. c. 

(1920-21-22) 

Sigma, E. A. P., Muse Club '20-'21, Editor 
Monthly '21, Altar Guild, Commencement Mar- 
shal '21, Editor Annual '22, Blue Ridge Delegate 
'20, Pres. St. Margaret '22, Certificate Piano 
'22, Choral Club '20-'21, Sect. Kate McKimmon 
'21. School Council '22, Class Poet '22, "Most 
Talented" '21. Inter-society debater '22, An- 
nual Board '21. 

But genius must be born. 
And never can be taught. 




Thirty-five 













,\l Am Louise Everett 

ROCKINGHAM, \. C. 

1919-20-21-22) 

Sigma, Sigma Lambda, Inter-Society debate 
1921, Capt. first team '21, Basket Ball manager 
'20-"21-'22, Commencement Marshal '21, Pres. 
Dramatic Club '22. Dramatic Club Plays '20-'21- 
'22, May Queen '21, Sect. School Council '20-'21- 
22, Chairman Honor Committee '22, Pres. Pan- 
Archon Council '22, vice president Sophomore 
Class '21. Class president '22, "Most Influen- 
tial," "Best All-round" '22. 

She's nil mil fancy painted hit-. 
She's lord'/, she's divine. 



Susan Virginia Fitch ett 

< APE < [IARLES, VA. 

(11)21-22) 

Altar Guild, E. A. P.. Mu. President Altar 
Build, Dramatic Club '21-'22. College Club '22, 
Assistant Librarian. 

Who not cunh lit llml teenier worth stand fast 
Looks forward, persevering to the last, 
From good hi heller, daily self-surpassed. 



Thirty-sis 












Josephine Lewis Forbes 

takuoro, k. c. 

(1920-21-22) 

Mu. E. A. P., Sketch Club '20-'21-'22, School 
Council '22, Annual Board '22, Captain Mu 
tennis '22, Vice president E. A. P. '22, Sect. & 
treas. St. Anne's '22, Altar Guild. 

"When she will she will — you can depend on 't 
When she won't she won't — there's an end on 'I. 



Kitty Lee Fkazieis 

raleigh. n. c. 

(1921-22) 

And her "Yes" once said to you 
Shall he "Yes" for evermore. 




Thirty-seven 







Eva Lee Fairbanks Glass 

SEWAKEE, TENN. 

(1920-21-22) 

Mu, Sigma Lambda, Sketch Club '20-'21, sect. 
& treas. Mu '22, President Lucy Bratton '22, 
Mu volley ball '20-'21, Altar Guild. Choral 
Club '22. 

"Good humor only tenches charms to lust 
Hakes new conquests and maintains the past." 



J* 



Mary Louise Harding 

GREENVILLE, N. C. 

(1921-22) 

Sigma. E. A. P., sec'y-treas., Altar Guild. 

They look into the oeauty of thy mind 

And that in guess, they measure oil thy deeds. 



Thirty-eight 






FeAWCES Sl'KTNGER HoSKIETS 

EAST LAS VEGAS, N. MEX. 

(1921-22) 

Mu. E. A. P., "Santa Claus," 21, Vice pres. class 
'22, Dramatic Club '21-'22, Pres. College Club 
'22, Altar Guild. 

True to herself 
True to her friends 
True to her duty always. 



S 



Elizabeth Lawrence 

raleigh, n. c. 

(1917-18-19-20-21-22) 

Sigma Lambda, M!u, Asst. Editor Bulletin '22, 
Class Testator '22, Altar Guild. 

Ever charming, ever new. 




Thirty-nine 







] toKoTii v < inKiHiN Nixon 

HERTFORD, N. V. 

(1920-21-22) 

President Sigma, '22, Vice pres. Sigma Lambda 
'22, Sec'y, S*' Catherine's '22, First team Sigma 
'22, Seo'y-treas. the Grand-daughters '22, Altai- 
Guild. 

\,,i i,,(i grave, not inn gay, but just » i«lhi 
good fellow. 



L/EKORE ClIEISTTNE POWELL 
JACKSONVILLE, II. A. 

(1920-21-22) 

Sigma, E. A. P.. Muse Club '21, Debater '21. 
Commencement Marshal '21. Mgr. tennis '21. 
Sec'y Class '21, Sec'y E. A. P. '21. Vice pres. 
E. A. P. '22, Pres. St. Monica '22, Annual Editor 
'22. E. A. P. Editor Bulletin '22, Chapel Warden 
'22, Blue Ridge Delegate '20. Class Phophet '22, 
Altar Guild. 



She is so frt 
position. 



so kind. 



ipt. st 



blessed dis 









Josephine Mask Hose 

HENDERSON, X. C, 
(1920-21-22) 

Sigma, Sigma Lambda, Pres. Sigma Lambda, 
'22, Pies. Sketch Club '22, Chapel Librarian '22, 
Pan-Archon Council '22, "Neatest" '21, ".Mos' 
Dignified" '22, Altar Guild. 

The glass of fashion initl the mold of form. 



Minnette Gordon Thompson 

JACKSONVILLE, N. C. 
(1920-21-22) 

Sigma, Sigma Lambda, Capt. first team '22, 
First team volley ball '21, Sec'y-treas. St. Mar- 
garet '22, "Most Athletic" 1922. 

With every charm thai wins the heart by un- 
title given. 





Hilda Geacb Tdkebntine 

KINSTON, N, C. 

(1920-21-22) 

VIu, Sigma Lambda. Sec'y Class '22, Muse Club 
'21, Chapel Warden '22, Treas. Sigma Lambda 
- 22, Altar Guild. 

Women will tare her that she is a woman. 
More worth than any man. Mia that . he is 
'/'lie rarest til all women. 



Ei(;e.\e Makion Wise 

LINl UL.XTON, N. < . 
(1921-22) 

E. A. P., Sigma, College Club '22. 

The reason jinn, the temperate will 

I' ml ii ran re. foresight, strength ami skill 















Dariel Woodbsos 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

(1921-22) 
Gentle of speech, beneficent of mind. 



Maky Wiatt Yarboroi i;ii 

LOUISBDBG, N. C. 

(1919-20-21-22) 

E. A. P., Sigma, Dramatic Club. '22, Altar Guild, 
Blue Ridge Delegate, '21, Class Treasurer, '22. 
Chapel Librarian, '22, "Biggest Chatterbox", '19. 
"Best Student", '22. Pres. St. Elizabeth's, '22. 

Anil still they gazed and still the wonder greiv 
That one small head could carry all she knew. 







Forty-three 













Inside 
Information 




It's hard to describe Wincie, because there 
isn't any word that exactly fits her. She's lovable, 
but she's more than that. She has a wonderful 
faculty of making everybody like her without even 
trying. I think I know the reason they do too. — 
she has a pair of the bluest eyes that a girl ever 
had, and they look straight at you, and tell you 
what kind of a girl Wincie is. She's wholesome 
and sincere and generous. There isn't very much 
more a body could wish, do you think? I'm sure 
the Mus doubt that there's anything more to be 
desired in a president! 



,* 



Whose voice is that protesting "I love you but 
yon don't love me"? Of course! It's our dear 
affectionate little song-bird, visiting after school 
hours. Casting aside her robe of dignity (used 
only on Tuesday nights at E. A. P. Meetings) to 
keep up her record for sociability. Evelina is in- 
deed one of the most popular of the Seniors, and 
one of the most looked-up-to of the class, by the 
other girls. Accomplishing a prodigious amount 
of work, walking away with the honors of Span- 
ish C, keeping the E. A. P.'s on the map, using 
her lungs for the Mus, and having time besides to 
write numerous letters to Chapel Hill, — that's the 
stuff that earns for Evelina the admiration of nil 
her friends and puts Lumberton on the St. Mary's 
Map. 






"To see Mr. Horton" that's Budge's invariable 
reply to the questioning glances directed at her 
as she starts out at 3:45 every day or so, very 
dignified and capable-looking in her gray suit and 
hat. For her position as chairman of the Muse 
board makes many such pilgrimages necessary and 
only Budge can come up smiling after a strenuous 
day of picture taking and annual making. Budge 
has been a devoted daughter of St. Mary's for five 
years and has not missed anything of importance 
that has happened here in that time. So it is to 
her we go for information about everything from 
parties and entertainments to little stores and 
Muse clubs and find her always willing to help 
us out. We could keep on forever telling you of 
the things Budge can do, but we say instead, as 
was said of a last year Senior "Give her of the 
fruits of her hands and let her own works praise 
her.'' And underneath all a romance, which we 
did not suspect until this year, appears now to 
add its interest to the other charms of our 
"Budget." 

"It's Eva Lee's time to sweep!" and Cheek 
settles herself leisurely on our window seat to 
regale us while we do our Saturday's cleaning up, 
with ridiculous accounts of her doings at the 
beach. And truly if you haven't heard Cheek talk 
as only she can you have missed a large part of 
the life of Senior hall. Prom being herself hope- 
lessly crushed last year she has turned "dignified 
Senior" this year to the extent of acquiring one 
or two devoted "satellites" for herself, and is one 
of the most popular and sought-after chaperones 
of the class. Cheek's heart is still, as always, in 
the literary societies and as she possesses a dis- 
tinct literary as well as humorous talent she will 
certainly prove a credit to herself and the E. A. P's. 
And last but not least she has the distinction of 
being one of the few bright stars of the class in 
Math. 

Muriel is about the peppiest member of the 
Senior Class. Her nickname is "Pep," so why 
shouldn't she be? For one so undeniably, ad- 
mittedly, and hopelessly in love. Muriel keeps in 
remarkably gay spirits. There's nothing that will 
down her; she always comes bobbing up with a 
smile. Muriel is frank too. Don't you love for 
people to be frank, so that you're never in doubt 
as to what they think of you and things like that ? 
There's never a time that Muriel isn't ready to 
help when she has the chance or is needed, and 
her help is always cheerful and always worth 
while. Muriel has the distinction of being the 
smallest member of the class. Isn't it strange 
that there should he so much good in such very 
little things? 




Fokty-five 







Every class must have its genius and truly was 
genius ever as great as ours? Louise is our pride 
and joy. Voted "most talented" in 1921 she has 
lived gloriously up to her reputation in her Senior 
year. Louise spins off poems at a moment's no- 
tice; she is the creator of whatever original ideas 
Senior entertainments may boast of; and most 
wonderful of all she writes— music! This last is 
almost beyond the bounds of our comprehension. 
Besides being a little bundle of natural talents. 
"Winkie" is an awfully susceptible maiden. May- 
be you didn't know that! You wouldn't question 
it however if you could see some of the tender 
love lyrics she has been guilty of writing. 



Wanted to know! If there's anything that needs 
to be done that Mary Louise can't do? One min- 
ute presiding with irreproachable dignity at a 
student meeting, the next sewing away most dili- 
gently at Christmas as "Mrs. Santa Claus" and 
again moving her audience to tears by her por- 
trayal of the "Orphan Judy" is a record for ver- 
satility unsurpassed. No wonder she has won the 
admiration and loyalty of every girl in school — a 
fine guard for the Sigmas, a first-rate debater for 
the Sigma Lambda's and the "best president the 
Seniors could have had!" Isn't this enough to 
justify our voting her the "best-all-round" and 
the "most influential" aside from the fact that 
she's just "Mary Louise." We think so. 

J* 

Who said "Virginia"? The mere mention of 
the name puts "Fitchett" (as it does all other 
loyal Virginians) on the run. "Fitchett" brings 
with her from our neighbor State the atmosphere 
of good old Southern frankness, good fellowship 
and a sunny disposition — even to her name, which 
in its full dignified length includes the beloved 
soil. But Susan has sufficiently divorced her 
thoughts from contemplations of home in the last 
two years, to become one of the truest and most 
loyal good workers for St. Mary's we have ever 
known. Carrying a heavy schedule on her own 
account, she nevertheless has time to spend many 
hours in conference with Evelina for the advance- 
ment of the "interests of the Society" (the E. A. P. ) 
and we all know the said society just couldn't get 
along without her. Besides Fitchett plays tennis 
with a good heart for the Mus, and she's an all- 
round good sport! 



■t 












"Madame President, I second the motion." Well, 
if it isn't Evelina's right hand man again! What 
would the E. A. P.'s, the Seniors, and above all 
tier room-mate do without dear, dependable Joe 
Always on hand to lend the strength of her con 
victions at literary societies, Senior meetings and 
School Council, and always to be relied on, Joe is 
an indispensable member of our family. Besides 
her literary ability, Joe has the distinction of be- 
ing a gifted artist and a first rate tennis player, 
and has also been known to steal off to the practice 
halls and play the piano for her own amusement. 
We strongly suspect the song is "The Old Fash- 
ioned Garden" as it "carries her back to that dear 
little shack." Oh yes! we forgot to say that Joe 
possesses one of the three fur coats in the Senior 
class and we're doubly proud of her for that! 



*„~* S 



Kitty Lee has been with us two years and in 
those two has managed to impress on us the fact 
that we "immigrants" haven't all the good high 
schools in the world in our own home towns. 
Raleigh is right there with the goods when it 
comes to turning out good students and Kitty Lee 
has continued her former good record at St. Mary's. 
Besides being able to cut with a word or two the 
Gordian knots which Mr. Way and Elizabeth {and 
Marion) manage to tie for us in philosophical 
discussions Kitty Lee shines daily with increas- 
ing luster for Mam'selle Ballou. We are proud to 
have a girl in our class who can do so many things 
— from singing in the Christmas Play to getting 
practically all the advertisements our Annual 
boasts. Here's to you, Kitty Lee! 



m 



We're glad to have such an artistic person as 
Eva Lee in the class. Even if she does cause Mr. 
Stone some few moments of trial, because she does 
love to scribble in his classes, we're really thank- 
ful for her talent, because it is to her nimble tin 
gers that we owe the pretty invitations and place- 
cards of the various Senior "affairs." Eva Lee has 
quite a list of accomplishments, some of which we 
forbear to name, for fear of making her less for- 
tunate sisters jealous. She has that enviable gift 
of successful cramming (to which 1)7 on History 
C exam, testifies) she's a master of the gentle art 
of writing elegant English and she's quite the 
thing, when it comes to tripping the light fan- 
tastic and executing the dangerous "Sheik" in the 
parlor. If you know Eva Lee, you know her be- 
loved Scwanee because that is indeed where her 
heart lies. 



'--.. 



Forty-seven 




If Mary Louise's friends suddenly began address- 
ing her letters to Miss M. U. instead of M. L. Hard- 
ing, we'd all know exactly what the change meant. 
For unselfishness is Mary's middle name. Always 
going out of her way to do something for the rest 
of us, for the teachers, and for anybody who needs 
help, encouragement^ compliments or food, Mary is 
the living proof of the fact that an "only child" is 
not necessarily spoiled. We particularly envy Mary 
her acknowledged ability to stand in with so many 
of the faculty. Luck to her everywhere, as great 
a success of life as she makes of Pedagogy, and 
love from the Seniors — what more could she de- 
sire? 



Frances brings from far-away New Mexico, to 
our Senior class, a voice replete with rolled "r's" 
(which she used to good advantage as jolly old St. 
Nick), a keen mind and an unquenchable ambi- 
tion. She is truly eonscientious_ if sitting up late 
and getting up early speak for' anything. There 
is a great deal of charm and dignity about Fran- 
ces, which shows itself when she presides over 
meetings of the college club. There's something 
more to her, however, than these highly commend- 
able qualities; there's real fun in her make-up and 
she has won the honest liking of every girl that 
has known her. Here's to you Frances! May you 
do us proud at Wellesley! 



Elizabeth puts the spice into Mr. Way's philo- 
sophy classes. She's our chief discusser, arguer 
and questioner. There isn't anything in the world 
that Elizabeth doesn't want to know. She's as 
bad as a little brother — which is perfectly right 
and proper, because she comes very near being 
one of those infant prodigies that Miss Morgan is 
most vehemently not in favor of. We don't know 
which we envy Elizabeth most, her cleverness her 
rose leaf complexion, her solo dancing, or' her 
guileless smile. 



FOETY-EIGHT 



We're all proud of our Sigma president, for 
she's all that a Sigma president ought to be — a 
thoroughly good sport. She knows how to en- 
courage the Sigmns when they're losing and to 
cheer them when they're winning, until their 
hearts fill with pride because they're Sigmas. She 
gives us the best leadership of all, a good example 
of faithfulness to practises and the right spirit in 
games. There are many things about "Twin" that 
make us love her; she's always ready for any 
kind of fun that comes her way from playing 
Indian, to playing practical jokes on any chance 
victim. Dorothy deserves a great deal of credit 
for graduating with our class, now that her twin 
Marjorie can't too; we accord her that credit with 
all our hearts, and we sympathize because we're 
as sorry as she is that Marjorie isn't graduating 
too. 



Pollyanna's last name was Harrington, but that 
was only because Mrs. E. H. Porter had never met 
Lenore. If she had we are sure it would have 
been Powell. Just what the Senior class would be 
without Lenore is difficult to imagine and — well 
we just don't want to imagine it anyway. Gay, 
carefree, friendly sympathetic, encouraging, — yet 
always glad and "happy— words fail us. We beg 
to be allowed to refer you for further information 
about her charms to at least one girl on every hall 
in school, then let her live up to the reputation. 
But that is not all — in her classes, her society, 
athletics and as the dignified Chief Marshal of '21, 
Lenore had displayed talent, ability and originality 
which rank her foremost in the order of the "Best- 
all-round." 



Jo got an Independent for a Christmas knock. 
May be you could guess why. Josephine is a ter- 
ribly outspoken, decided person. There is a ring 
in her voice when she really wishes to convince 
anybody that defies contradiction. We really 
wouldn't want to contradict her anyway. That's 
the way with attractive people. They can say 
anything they want to and get away with it. Jo- 
sephine can't really be appreciated until you see 
her dressed in George A's suit with her hair slicked 
back and her hands in her pockets. Then you 
wonder how such a pretty girlish girl could ever 
make such a good-looking," mannish man. 





W% 




FORTY-NINK 







■'Ray, ray; Row, row 
Sigmas show 'em how!" 

The ball goes up in center and then straight into 
the sure swift hands of "Minnette" — the Sigmas' 
pride and joy and the Captain of the first team! 
Into everything athletic and in it to win, Minn- 
ette has well earned her title of "Most Athletic, 
1922." Full of pep and lots of sense besides, 
Minnette makes a fine old pal and royal good com- 
pany — witness the many enthusiastic admirers 
among "the girls" to say nothing of the Seniors. 
And all of us know by Minnette's ability to get 
through N. Philosophy a whole year ahead of time 
that she is "all there" when it comes to brains. 
Who can deny that when she always makes around 
95 on that formidable subject N. Latin. 



Do you like dear old-fashioned gardens, warm 
and fragrant with the perfume of roses and honey- 
suckle? — with tiny little shell-lined paths and 
Johnny-jump-ups peeping at you everywhere? Be- 
cause if you do you will surely like Hilda. She's 
a dear little, quaint little old-fashioned girl, whom 
we all love to see dressed up as an Easter Corsage, 
or Silveroell, but who is equally adorable in her 
own little organdies that seem to have a special 
Hilda-ish style all their own. The marvel of it is 
Hilda is as modern as any 1922 man could wish 
(and they're apt to wish them modern). You 
never fully realize it until you break on her in 
the parlor and find out what a really good little 
follower she is. Though on the exterior Hilda is 
always gay and cheerful we all know that at heart 
she is Ernest. 



Marion Wise! The name itself suggests a great 
deal, and makes the task of description much 
easier, for Marion is indeed Wise. Didn't Mr. 
Way call her a "true philosopher"? There are 
real stores of knowledge in the recesses of Mari- 
on's brain and she has the real scholar's fearless- 
ness when it comes to speaking her opinions and 
barking them up with her own line of reasoning. 
If it weren't for the one or two favored members 
of our class who take genuine delight in argu- 
ments we would miss much of the excitement 
that we now have. Marion is always ready for a 
good time and she can be just as nonsensical as 
anyone could wish when desired. Don't you agree 
that this combination of the sensible and the silly 
is an excellent one for just such a Senior class as 
ours? 












Dariel has always had a quiet but strong in- 
fluence in our class. She has shown a loyalty 
and a willingness to help that is so much appre- 
ciated in day pupils who cannot he with us for 
much of our fun. Dariel has a gentle, attractive 
personality and a good mind, which holds in 
special favor that (to most of us) troublesome 
study, biology. We don't know what we would 
do without Dariel when it comes to shopping for 
Senior stunts. She's a good all-round girl and 
we're glad to have her in our class! 



Who would think to look at her blond curls 
flying to the four winds in an exciting game of 
tennis with — perhaps Lenore. that one of the clear- 
est and best cultivated minds at St. Mary's was 
lying just beneath those curls? Always having 
time to play, to dance, to enjoy life, yet never 
neglecting her work. Mary Wiatt's disposition is 
one of the best we know. Modest about her ac- 
complishments, never boring you with the "ego," 
generous to a fault, and cheerful and sympathetic 
besides, Mary Wiatt is a rare combination of 
friend and pal, much loved and appreciated by all 
who know her. Finding "Romance" right around 
her she is a happy, contented, loyal daughter of 
St. Mary's. 





ST MARY'S SCHOOL LIBRARY 



Mentor Gossip 

The class oi uineteeu twenty-two 

We're quite "the stuff" you know, 
Bu1 mice I heard some startling facts 

( you'd scarce believe 'twas so ! ) 
1 lui Man/ Wiatl one line clay 

Went up the street, they swore, 
And didn't liny a bit of f I 

To bring back for Lenore! 

And Evelina Beclcwith once 

Went two whole days I knew. 
And didn't kiss her "Hilda dear," 

( Ir ask us "Where is due '." 
Our little "Pep" for three long weeks 

Accomplished this great feat, 
She never once said Bessie Brown 

< >r Maynard Oakes was sweet ! 

Miss Helen Bvtdcje (of all strange things) 

Was known one time to say 
"The Annual ra' In r bores me, so 

I jtisi won't work today." 
And Eva Lee is never beard 

Al any time to praise 
Iler dear Sewanee any more ! 

( She used to rave for days, i 

And Frances Tioshins never savs 

"By George!" to anybody; 
And Lawrence doesn't argue now! 

( It used to be her hobby. ) 
•/. Rose is now "reducing"— 

She cuts her sweets and fats. 
And M. L. Everett's raising a 

Menagerie of eats ! 

Anil all the other things 1 know 

Would make yon shake your head : 
Ami wonder if I really had 

I n hive of truth keen bred, 
For ill that good old Senior ('hiss 

The things I've seen them do 
I lave often shocked me quite a hil ; 

They may surprise yon too! 



L. A. E. 

Fifty-two 






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Fifty-three 







THE JUNIOR CLASS 



FiFTY-FOUB 




&f)e Class; of 1923 

Motto: "He who conquers, conquers himself." 
Colors: Scarlet and Or ay Flower: Scarlet Poppy 

CLASS OFFICERS 

Lucile Dempsey President 

Marjorie Willard Vice-President 

Doris Swett Secretary-Treasurer 

■Ji 

representatives on the school council 
Lucile Dempsey Evelyn Way Vah Cleve Welkins 

_•* 

CLASS ROLL 

Elise Ballard, Washington Ruth Doris Swett, Southern Pines 

Grace Barbour, Clayton Evelyn Way. Raleigh 

Bessie Brows, Greenville Elizabeth Webb, Wadesboro 

Daisy Cooper, Oxford Helen Webb, Hillsboro 

Lucile Dempsey, Goldsboro Van Cleve Wilkins, Athens, Ga. 

Elizabeth Hickerson, Ronda Marjorie Willard, Wilmington 

Claudia Jones. Raleigh Margaret Wood, Marion, S. C. 

Elizabeth Josey, Scotland Neck Nellie Wynne, Williamston 

Laura Smith, Charlotte Elizabeth Zeigler, Edenton 
Class Adviser: Miss Sutton 

Fifty-five 










SOPHOMORES. 




H\)t Clastf of 1924 

Colors: Green and White Flower: Marechal Niel Rose 

Motto: "Bver onward, i'm- upward." 



CLASS OFFICERS 

Lucy Lay President 

Sophie Egleston Vice-President 

Lorraine Smytiie Secretary-Treasurer 



REPRESENTATIVES ON THE SCHOOL COUNCIL 
AimiK Huske Lucy Lay 







CLASS 


ROLL 




Ballou 


Farr 




Johnston, N. 


Saunders 


Banks, H. 


Grayson 




Jordan 


Smytiie 


Battle 


GRESIIAM 




Knott 


S W I N K 


Best 


Hardin 




Lay 


Thigpen 


Beth e a 


Harris 




Lewis, M. H. 


Thompson, B. E 


Blakely 


Hines 




Little 


Turner 


Bonner 


HlNNAXT 




Meredith 


White. R. 


Chamberlain 


Holmes 




McMillan. E. 


Withers, M. 


Davenport 


Hid LIES 




McMillan, J. 


Worrell 


I)i vim; 


Huske 




Page 


Wright 


Egleston. S. 












Class 


Adviser; 


Miss Morgan 




Fifty-seven 












Fifty-eight 












y 



W : ^-- v - 












-v- 



,«« 







\u 







tKlje Class of 1925 



( 'ni, iii;s : Purple and Lavender Flower : I Met 

Motto: "Aim liii/li, but reach higher. 



.IllSKP 

Mai.-y 
Mart 



CLASS OFFICERS 



in NE Gould . . . . 

Poweli 

Louise Collier 



1' reside id 

Vice-President 

.Secretary-Treasurer 



representative on the school council 
Louise Hairston 









CLASS 


ROLL 




Ambler 




Garrett 




McKenzie 


Stephenson 


Bailey 




Gould 




McLean 


Stockard 


Banks, M. 


L. 


Hairston 




Newton, N. 


Storr 


Bartholomew 


Harden 




Newton, C. 


Thompson, A. 


BATCIIELOR 




Hardy 




O'DONNELL. K. 


Trexler 


Baxter 




Harrell 




O'DONNELL, M. 


Tripp 


Black 




Hart 




Perry. H. 


Tucker, I. G. 


Bn II ANNAN 




Hen k el 




Powell, H. 


Tucker, L. K. 


Boyd 




Hill 




Powell. M. 


Tyson 


Brinkley 




Hitchcock 




Rand 


Walters 


Brown, M. 


K. 


Johnston, M 




Reiniiart 


Ward 


Burro wes 




Jones, M. E 




RlDDICK 


White. J. E. 


Bush 




Kimball 




Roberts 


Whitehead 


C HEATH AM 


E. 


KlTTRELL 




Rodman 


Wilkins, I. 


Clarke 




Lo\YUY 




Rose, E. 


Wilkinson,. M. 


Collier 




Martin 




Rotter 


Wilson 


Cooke 




Muse 




Sims 


Womble 


Fisher 




McConnell 




Spence 


Wragg 


Garner 
















Class 


Advisei 


; Mr. Way 




Fifty-nine 

























THE PREP5. 




Cfje Preparatory department 

Coloks: Pink and Blue Flowbe: Sweet Pea 

Motto: "Children should be seen and not heard." 

* 

CLASS OFFICERS 

Mabel Hawkins President 

Amik Cheatham Vice-President 

Emily Hadlow Secretary-Treasurer 

representative on the school council 
Mabel EEawki ns 

>« 

CLASS ROLL 

Armstrong Everett, M. T. Jones, D. Proctor 

Barber, E. Everett Lewis, K. Raglanu 

Baugh Findlay Matthews Raine 

Blackmore Gale Metts Raymond 

Brown, E. Hadlow Montgomery Scott 

Brown. M. K. Hawkins Moore, E. Siierrod 

Burgwyn Higgs Moore, R. Smith M. T. 

Caelum Holt Morris Taylor 

Carr Hopkins Moser Waddell 

Cheatham. A. Hughes, M. H. MoMi'llan White. V. 

Cooper, E. Inolksuy Newberry Wilcox 

Cox Everson Norwood Wilkes 

Dixon Jeffries O'Donnell. D. Williams, E. 

Dougherty, D. Jeffreys Phillips, M. Williams. M. 

Eagles Johnston, W. Phillips, B. R. Williamson 

Ellison Yaruohougii M. E. 
Class Adviser: Miss Turner 

Sixty-one 









ID^y IPiapalls 



Colors: Purple and White 



Flower: Violet 



.* 



Kitty Lee Frazier President 

Mary Yarbrougjj Vice-President 

Katiierixe Harden Secretary and Treasurer 



Barber 
Batchelor 

Bonner 
Brown, B. 
Browk, E. T. 
Ellison 
Frazieu 
Harden 
Hill 
Hughes 



Jones 


Stephenson 


Knott 


Stockard 


Matthews 


Stoor 


Moser 


Thompson 


Metts 


Ward 


O'DONNEI.L, D. 


W \ ileus 


'Don nell. K. 


WILLIAMS 


O'Do.NNELL, M. 


Womble 


Phillips, B. R. 


WOOI>ESON 


Phillips, M. 


YARBOROUG1I 


Rami 






Sixty -three 




Jt 




Margaret Lvcile Dempsey Josephine Mann Rose 
Goldsboro, N. C. 

Art Art 



Josephine Lewis Forbes 
Tarboro, N. C. 

Art 



vjj 






Sixty-four 









Van Cleve Wilkins 

Athens, Ga. 

Art 



Bessie Rusk Brown 

Greenville, N. C. 

Voice 



Louise Aiken Egleston 

Hartsville, S. C. 

Piano 











Daisy Strong Cooper 

Oxford, N. C. 

Expression 



Edith Lorraine Smythe 

Strawn, Texas 
Expression 



■* 



Louise Jones H.uhstox 
Reidsville. N. C. 
Domestic Science 



All a Meredith 

Tarboro, N. C. 
Domestic Science 



£ 



Elizabeth Roberts 
Gatesville, N. C. 

Home Economics 



Eunice Stockard 
Raleigh, N. C. 

Home Economics 




Sixty-seven 



. 






















SNOW PICTURES 






&fje €p£tlon gUpfja $t Utterarp ikitietp 

Founded 1900 

Colors: Olive and Gold Flower: Jonquil 

Motto: Esse Quam Videri 

OFFICERS 

Evelina IjECKwrrn President 

Lenore Powell First Vice President 

Josephine Forbes Second Vice 1' resident 

Sophie Eglestox Secretary 

Heles Webb Treasurer 



EDITORS: BULLETIN 

LekOre Powell '22 — Editor-in-Chief Louise Hairstoh '24- 



■Assistant 



Lol'ise Egleston 



INTER-SOCIETY DEBATERS 



Lenore Powell 



Sophie Eglestok% '23 



COMUKXCE.VIKNT MARSHALS 



Helen' Webi 





HONORARY MEMBERS 




Miss Bottum 


Mu. Jones 


Miss R( 


)BE 


:rts Miss 


Weeks 


Miss Brooks 


Miss Lee 


Miss M< 


■K 


immon Miss 


Cooke 




Miss Ballou 


,< 




Mr. Tucker 






ACTIVE MEMBERS 




Ballou 


Grayson 


Lawrence, A. 




Perry 


Tatem 


Basks. H. 


Green 


Lewis, K. 




Powell, H. 


Taylor 


Beckwitii 


Hairston 


Lewis, M. H. 




Powell, L. 


Thexler 


Black 


Hardin 


Little 




Powell, M. 


Tucker 


Boyd 


Harding 


Marshall 




Proctor 


Wallace 


Chamberlain 


Hardy 


Martin 




Raglan d 


Webb 


Cooke 


Hester 


Meredith 




Raymond 


Wheeler 


Cooper. U. 


Hll'KERSON 


Moore, R. 




Reinhart 


White. J. 


Davenport 


HlGGS 


Morris 




Riddick 


White, V. 


Divine 


HlNNANT 


McConnel 




Roberts 


Whitehead 


Dixon 


HOSKINS 


McLean 




Rodman 


Wilcox 


Egleston, L. 


Hughes 


McMillan, E. 




Rotter 


Wilkes 


Egleston, S. 


Huske 


McMillan, J. 




Saunders 


Wilkins. I. 


Fare 


Ingles by 


McMullan 




Scott 


Williams 


Ftndley' 


IVERHON 


Newberry' 




Sims 


Wilson 


FlTCHETT 


Jeffreys, J. 


Newton, C. 




Smith. L. 


Wise 


Forbes 


Jones, M. 


Newton. N. 




Smith. M. T. 


Wragg 


Garrett 


Jordan 


Norman 




Smyth e 


Wynne 


Gold 


Knox 


Norwood 
Page 




SWETT 


Yarborough 


Seventy-one 





















Ir'KVKX TV-TWO 






g>ic$ma Hambba Uttcrarp isocietp 

Founded 1900 

Colors: Purple and Gray Flower: Fellow Jessamine 

Motto: Lit Willi The Sun 

OFFICERS 

Josephine Rose President 

Dorothy Nixon First Vice President 

Marjorie Xixiix Second Vice President 

Muriel Dougherty Secretary 

Hilda Turuentine Treasurer 

EDITORS: BULLETIN 

I.rrv Lay- Editor-in-Chief Elizabeth Lawrence, Assistant 

INTER-SOCIETY DEBATERS 

Anx.v Lee Bailey Lucy Kimball 

«•* 

COMMENCEMENT MARSHALS 

I.i cy Lay, '23, Chief 
Lucile Deaipsev, '23 Marjorie Wii.i.akh. ':.':! 

honorary members 

Miss Cummings Miss Fenner Miss Kretschmer Miss Sutton 

Miss Davis Miss Giiiiiens Miss B. A. Morgan Miss Mattheson 

Miss Fox Miss Hesse Miss St. John Mrs. Tuokes 

ACTIVE MEMBERS 

Ambler Brown, B. Dougherty, M.Hines VEandeville Thompson, M. 

Armstrong Brown, M. Eagles Hitchcock Montgomery Tripp 

Ashworth Budge Everett, M. T. Holmes Moore, E. Tucker, I. G. 

Bailey Burgwyn Everett, M. L.Holt Muse Turner 

Ballard Brsn Fisher Jeffries, H. McKenzie Turrentine 

Banks, M. Caiijji Gale Johnston, M. Nixon, D. Tyson 

Barbour Cakh Garner Johnston, N. Nixon, M. Waddell 

Bartholomew Cheatham, A. Class Johnston, W. Raine Webb, M. E. 

Battle Cheatham, E. Gould Jones, D. Rose, E. White, R. 

Baugh Clarke Gresham Josey Ruse, J. Wilkins, M. 

Baxter Collier Hadlow Kimball Spence Wilkins, v.-C. 

Best Cooper, E. Harrell Kittrell Smith, M. L. Wilkinson 

Blackmore Cox Harris Knox Swink Willard 

Blakely Dempsey Hart Lawrence, E. Thigpen Withers 

Bohannon Dougherty, D. Hawkins Lay Thompson, A. Worrell 

Bri.ykley Lowry Thompson, E. Ziegler 

Seventy-three 







DEMPSEY WIU.ARD 



LAY 
J* 



l.i cy Lay. 2 A. Chief 

M A.RJI II!] E W'l I.I.AIIli - A 

LlTCILE I )EMPSBY - A 

Si ii'M 1 E EoiJESTON E A II 

Helen Webb B A II 

Tlic Literary Societies, named after the two leading Southern poets — Edgar 
Allan I'iic, Sidney Lanier— have since their organization, played a leading part 
in the life at St. Mary's. Regular meetings are held to celebrate social occa- 
sions — Founder's Day, Armistice Day, Lee's birthday, Washington's birthday, 
etc. For nineteen years, animal Enter-Society debates have been held and ad- 
ditional competition between the two societies lias been in the form i>( "Model 
Meetings." 

This year, the society contest consisted of two Model Meetings held by each 
society, the Annual Debate, and a new feature, — the society submitting the 
best two mil 'if three contributions to the essay, short story and poem contest, 
receiving the remaining number of points that heretofore have stood as the 
prize for the best editing of the Monthly Muse. 

The iineneement Marshals are chosen annually by the Societies, the Chief 

Marshal being chosen by each in turn. 

Seventy-four 







KIMBALL BAILEY 



EGLEST0N 



S 



3nter =is>orietp Befcatcrg 



Resolved, Thai orphans should be cared for in private homes, and nol in 
orphanages. 

Affiemative Epsilon Alpha Pi 

Louise Egleston '22, ami Lenorb Powell '22 



Negative 



LUCy KliMltALL '25, AND Ad?. t a Lee Bailey '25 



Sigma Lambda 



2tljc Jubgtsi 



Miss Mary Owen Graham Rev. I. Harding Hughes 

Mr. Marshall DeLancey Haywdou 



The dehate was decided iiiianiiiinuslv in favor of the negative. 



Skvkntv-five 




Mu Team's gonna shine tonight 

Mn Team's gonna shine, 

Mu Team's gonna shine tonight 

Sigmas will pine 

Mu Team's gonna shine tonight 

Mu Team's gonna shine. 

When the sun goes down 

And the moon conies up 

Mu Team's gonna shine. 

She's a wonder, she's a dream, 
She's the captain of our team, 
Hardin', Hardin', Hardin'! 









Seventy-six 



Ray! Ray! row! row! 
Sigmas, show 'em how ' 

Rip! Rah! Rus! 

Confess we must 

Who is best 

Next to us. 
Mu team, Mu team 
Rip! Rah! Rus! 



^tgma §>elte 



We are happy when we yell 
\lu learn, Mu team go to — 
S-I-G-M-A team, team, team! 

Horse and wagon. Horse and wagon. 
Team, team, team. 
Locomotive, locomotive 
Coach, coach, coach! 



Jump on the grandstand. 
Beat on the tin can, 
Who can? We can! Nobody else can. 
Sign;. i ! 

I thought I heard somebody say that the Sigma girls were coming this way 
With a veevo and vivo; and veevo; vivo, vuin. 
Oh! it's just as plain as it can be; we've got the Mu team up a tree 
With a veevo and vivo; and veevo, vivo, vum. 

When the good old Sigmas fall in line, 

We're going to beat the Mus another time. 
We'll put a bright red banner on the wall 

For the Sigma girls can sho' play basketball! 
We've got the forwards, guards and centers too. 

And we will surely make the Mus look blue; 
Come on Sigmas win the game, win the game- — 

Good night Mus! 



Jflu § elte 



Hit 'em high. 
Hit 'em low, 
Mu Team 
Let's go! 

M-U— That's the way to spell it, 

RAY! MU! That's the way we yell it! 

Had a little rooster 
Sat him on the fence 
Crowed for the Mus 
Cause he had good sense. 

When you're up, you're up, 
When you're down, you're down, 
When you're up against the Mus 
You're upside down! 

Fight for the Mu Team 
Mu Team will win 



Fight to the finish 

Never give in 

You do the best girls 

We'll do the rest girls 

Fight for the 'ole Mu Team. 

We'll pass that ball like Mus, 
We'll pass that ball like Mus. 
When the guards are weak we'll pass it 

through. 
When the guards are strong, we'll pass it 

too. 
We'll pass that ball like Mus. 

The Mu girls' pep, 
The Mu girls' pep. 
They've got it over all: 
And believe me, oh, by gosh. 
They sho' play basketball. 



Seventy- seven 




Seventy-eight 









Jffltt ^itfjlettc iHs&ociatton 

( 'olohs: Dark Blue, and While 



.1 1 T.i a Winston Ash worth President 

Eva Lee Glass Secretary-Treasurer 

Van ( 'i.evk Welkins Manager Basketball 

Ruth Fare Manager Volleyball 

Mary Louise < 'ollier I 

( 7/ eer Leaders 

Josephine Gould \ 

Josephine Fokues Manager Tennis 



Ambler 
Ashworth 

Bailey 

Banks, H. 

Banks. M. 

Baugii 

Beckwith 

Brinkley 

Brown 

Burgwyn 

Borrows 

Cheatham, 

Cheatham, 

Cheek 

Clarke 

Collier 

Dempsey 

Divine 

Dixon 

Dougherty, 

Dougherty, 

Eagles 

Everett, M. 

Everett, M. 

Farr 







MEMBERS 


Fitchette 




Jordan 


Forbes 




K 1 M BALL 


Gale 




Lawrence 


Garrett 




Lesi ey 


Glass 




Lewis, K. 


Gold 




Lewis, M. H. 


Gould 




Little 


Gresham 




Lnniv 


FI uiiux 




Mandeville 


Harris 




Meredith 


Hart 




McCONNELL 


HIKES 




McKknzie 


Holmes 




McMillan. E 


Holt 




McMillan. J. 


Hopkins 




McMullaa- 


HOSKTNS 




Newberry 


Hughes 




Parker 


Jeffries 




Perry 


Jeffreys 




Pigeon 


Johnston, 


M. 


EtEINIIART 


Johnston. 


N. 


Riddick 


Johnston. 


W. 


Roberts 


Jones, D. 




Rodman 


Jones, M. 




Scott 



A. 
E. 



SllERROD 

Smith. L. C. 
Smith. M. T, 
S PENCE 

Swett 
Taylor 

Tatem 

rHIGPEN 

Thompson, 

TnoMPSON, 

Tripp 

Tucker 

Turrentine 

Wallace 

Wheeler 

White. J. 

White, R. 

White, V. 

Wn kins, M. 

WlLKINS, I. 
WlLKINS, V. C. 

Wilkinson 
Wilson 
Wood 
Wright 



Skvknty-nine 



^>igma &tf)lettc gtesoctatton 



Colors: Bed and White 



Jt 



Dorothy Nixon 

Marjory- Nixon 

Mary Louise Everett 

Mary Powell 

Marjory Willard . . . 
Martha Best 
Katiierine Morris 
Mabel Hawkins 



President 

.Secretary-Treasurer 
.Manager Basketball 
. Manager Volleyball 

. . .Manager Tennis 



. Cheer Leaders 



£ 







MEMBERS 




Armstrong 


Egleston, S. 


McLean 


Saunders 


Ballard 


Everett, M. L 


Montgomery 


Sims 


Ballou 


Findlay 


Moore. E. 


Smith,- L. J. 


Barhour 


Fisher 


Moore. R. 


Smythe 


Bartholomew 


Garner 


Morris, K. 


Bwink 


Battle 


Grayson 


Muse 


Thompson, M. 


Baxter 


Hadlow 


Newton, C. 


Trexler 


Best 


Hairston 


Nixon, D. 


Tucker, I. G. 


Black 


Harding 


Nixon, M. 


Turner 


Blackmore 


Hardy 


Norman 


Tyson 


Blakely 


Harrell 


Norwood 


Wa UDELL 


BOHAKNOK 


Hawkins 


Page 


Webb; H. 


Boyd 


Hester 


Powell, H. 


Webb. M. E. 


Brown, M. 


Htckerson 


Powell, L. 


Whitehead 


Budge 


Higcs 


Powell, M. 


Wilcox 


Bush 


Hitchcock 


Proctor 


Wilkes 


Callum 


Huske 


Ragland 


Willard 


Carr 


IVERSON 


Raine 


Williams 


Chamberlain 


JOSEY 


Raymond 


Wise 


Cooke 


KlTTRELL 


Rees 


Worrell 


Cooper, D. 


Knox 


Rose, E. 


Withers 


Cooper, E. 


Lawrence, A. 


Rose, J. 


Wragg 


Cox 


Lay- 


Rotter 


Wynne 


Davenport 


Martin 




Yaruorough 


Egleston, L. 






Ziegler 


ElUHTY-OKE 










WOOD BAILEY HARDIN BI'RROWES ASHWOR.TH 1!. BROWN 



&fje JWu pasketMl Gleam, 1922 

First Team 

Forwards Bessie Brows', Frances Burrowes 

Centers Mart Hardin (Capt.), Margaret Wood 

Guards Adna Lee Bailey, Julia Wisstok Ash worth 







THOMPSON 

WILCOX .SMYTH]". 

NIXON BLAKLEY HAWKINS 

J* 

®\)t g>igma pasifeetbaU torn, 1922 

Fikst Team 

Forivards Minette Tiiompson ( ( 'apt. ). Madge Blakely 

Centers Makcia Wilcox, Mabel Eawkins 

Guards Lokbaine Smythe, Dorothy Nixon 



Eighty-three 








mm 

liiiiiiil 




" WINCIE" 



SECOND TEAM 
BASKETBALL 



THIRD TEAM 
BASKETBALL 



K\)t fflu pagUetball femg, 1922 

Van C'leve Wilkixs, Manager 
Second Team Tli ir 

E. Faer. E. Way Forwards C. Holmes. V. 

E. McMullas (Capt.) Centers S. Wright (Capt), 

V. C. Wit.ki,\s, ]). Jones Guards D, Swett, M, T, 

ftije Jflu "^ollepbaU Yearns, 1922 

Ruth Farr, Manager 
Firs! Team Second Team 



1 Team 

TlIIGPEK" 

L. Scott 
Everett 





Hardin 




Reinhart 




Way 




Collier, M. L 




Ml'Ml'UAK 




White. R. 




Smith, L. C. 




McKehzie 




Burrowes 




Sl'ENCE 




Bailey 




Ambler 




Farr 




Gale 




Glass 


Substitutes 


Gresiiam 












SWETT 








Banks 








Divine 





ElUHTY-FOUK 










SECOND TEAM 
BASKETBALL 



THIRD TEAM 
BASKETBALL 



{Efje g>tgma pasfeetball Yearns, 1922 

Maey Louisb Everett. Manager 
Second Tetini Third Team 

Ida Hinxant, E. Hadi.ihv Forwards A. Martin, E. Hiokerson 

M. Powell, (Capt.), L. Kittkelx . Centers . . . .1!. Ballot (Capt.), K. Morris 

i). CoOPEBj M. YARBOROIIill (llltirtlx M. WlLLAKI), M. iS.VUXDEKS 



Ufa £igma Uolleptmll Yearns;, 1922 

Mary Powell, Manager 
First Team Second Team 



WlLLAKII 




Powell. M 


HlCKERSOX 




Thompson 


Page 




Wilcox 


Yarbobough 




Powell, L. 


Nixon" 




Smythe 


KlTTKKLI, 




Cooper. D. 


Saunders 




HlNNANT 


JOSEY 


Substitutes 

BciYD 

Hairston 
Ballotj 


Blakely 






ElliHTY FIVE 




TliNNIK UNTHUSIASTS 



W$t Cennfa tournament 1922 

Eacb association was represented by a team of eight players, and the players 
of one team played the corresponding players of the other team in an elimination 
tournament, each winner gaining a certain number fit' points for her side, [n 
the final contest, the winner became the school champion of the year. 

Wot Yearns 



Majrjorie WiixarDj Sigma Manager, 
Sigma 

KlTTRELL 

Cooper 
Powell, L. 
Will and 
Yabbobough 
Page 

Powell, M. 
Hickerson 



.Josephine Forbes, ,1/// Manager 

Mil 

McKenzie 

Thigpen 

Forres 

Blrrowes 

Hardin, M. 

Dougherty 

SWETT 

Smith, L. 



The Champions will be announced in the Blue Book of V.)'2'2. 












&tf)lettc £>core, 1921=22 



Pasfeetball 



FIRST TEAM GAMES 

November 12 Mu 20; Sigma 18 

December 3 Sigma 2S; Mu 14 

February 4 Mu 18; Sigma 16 

Won by Mu; 30 points 



SECOND TEAM GAMES 

November 19 Sigma 21; Mu 11 

December 10 Mu 28; Sigma 18 

February 11 Sigma 16 ; Mu 

Won by Sigma; 20 points 



THIRD TEAM GAMES 

November 12 Sigma 22 ; Mu 12 

December 3 Sigma 29 ; Mu 14 

Won by Sigma; 10 points 



^olltPball 



FIRST TEAM GAMES 

March 11 Sigma 44 ; Mu 37 

April 1 Sigma 45 ; Mu 40 

Won by Sigma; 15 points 



SECOND TEAM GAMES 

March 11 Mu 30; Sigma 26 

April 1 Sigma 36 ; Mu 14 

April 7 Mu 38; Sigma 32 

Won by Mu; 10 points 



Spring SUfjlftic ifflret 



Dash: Sigma Mu 

First — Marcia Wilcox 2 

Second — Ida Hinnant 1 

Relay Race: 

Won by Sigma 4 



Running Broad Jump: 
First — Ida Hinnant 
Second — Marcia Wilcox 



Shuttle Relay: 

Won by Sigma 



Basketoall Throw: 

Won by Sigma 3 

First — Dorothy Nixon 1 

IS 



Score: Mu 40; Sigma 63. 

Tennis counts 27 points. 

The outcome of tennis will decide the final score which will be published in the 
Blue Book of 1922. 



Eighty-Seven 




Cfjurdj iidjool ikrbtce league, 1921=22 

General Directress Miss McKimmon 

TEE cor sell, 
Evelina Beckwith, Chairman 



The Chapter Presidents ex-officit 



THE CHAPTER OFFICERS 

St. Agnes' Chapter Kate McKimmon Chapter 

Julia Winston Ash worth President Adiiie Huske 

Elise Ballard Secretary Louise Hairston 

Mabel Hawkins Treasurer Lucy Lay 



St. Anne's Chapter 
Evelina Beckwith 
Josephine Forbes . . 



. . . .President 

.Secretary-Treasurer . 



Lucy Brattnn Chapter 

Eva Lee Glass 

Leone Hines 



St. Elizabeth's Chapter St. Margaret's Chapter 

Mary Wiatt Yabborough President Louise Egleston 

Mary Louise Everett Vice-President Frances Hoskins 

Sophie Egleston secretary-Treasurer Minette Thompson 

Miss Davis Faculty Adviser Miss Weeks 



St. Monica's Chapter 
Lenore Powei.i 



Muriel Dougherty 
Miss Turner 



St. Catherine's Chapter 

President Helen Budge 

Secretary Dorothy Nixon 

Treasurer Hilda Tihrentine 

Secretary-Treasurer 

Faculty Adviser Mrs. Way 



Eighty-eight 










Miss Kate McKimmox Directress 

Susan Fitchett President 

Mary Louise Harding Secretary-Treasurer 

ASHWOKTH BGLESTON, L. HUSKE NlXON. D. 

Ballou Egleston, S. Jordah Powell, L. 

Battle Forbes Josey Ruse. J. 

Beckwith Glass Lawrence Smith, L. C. 

Budge Haedin Lay Swett 

Cheek Harding Lewis, M. H. Thigpen 

Cooper. D. Hickerson Little Turrentine 

Divine Hinnant Meredith Wilkiks, V. C. 

Dougherty, M. Holmes McMillan, E. Worrell 

FlTCHETT HOSKINS McMlLLAN, J. YaRBOROUGII 

■J* 

CHAPEL OFFICERS 1321-1922 
Wardens 
Muriel Dougherty Helen Budge 

Lenore Powell Hilda Turrentine 

Librarians 
Josephine Rose Mary Wiatt Yarborough 

Eighty-mine 







THE COLLEGE CLUB 

W&t College Club 

Frances Hoskins President 

Li cy Lav Vice-President 

( Ilare Spence Secretary-Treasurer 

..< 

HONORARY MEMBERS 
Miss Morgan Me. Way 

.M iss Turner, Adviser 
.< 

ACTIVE MEMBERS 

Bartholomew Holmes 

Blackmore Hoskins 

Bohannon Kimball 

Brinkley Lay 

burgwyn mcconkell 

Bush Spence 

Chamberlain Swett 

Cheatham. E. Way 

Fitciiette Wise 

Hickerson Wood 

Hinhant Withers 
Wynne 






Ninety 







THE DRAMATIC CLUB 
J* 

ftije Bramattc CEhib 

-Miss Florence C. Davis Director 

M ai.-v Louise Everett President 

Lokeaine Smytue Business Manager 

MEMBERS 

Acton Dougherty, M. Musk 

Ballou Everett, M. L. Page 

Best Evebett, M. T. Powell, L. 

Blackmobe Fitchett Smythe 

Carr Gould Tyson 

Chamberlain Hardy Whitehead 

Cooper, D. Hoskins Wilcox 

Dixon- Lay Yarborough, M. W. 
Moore, E. 

Ninety-one 




THE CHORUS 



s 



Miss Weeks 
Miss Abbott 



3Tfje Cfjorus 



.... Director 
. . I ccompanist 



* 



Ambler 
BaUGI] 

BoIIANNAN 
BOYD 

Brown, B. 

Brown, M. 

Callum 

Clark 

Dougherty, 

Dixon 

Eagi.es 

Gould 



MEMBERS 






Harrell 


Powell, H. 




Highs 


Ragland 




Hill. MICK 


Stockard 




Jeffreys 


Thompson, A. 


L. 


Jordan 


WAV 




Lav 


Wilkes 




Lewis, K. 


Wilkinson 




Meredith 


Williams 




McKenzie 


Wood 




Montgomery 


Worrell 




Mi 'se 


Wright 




Newberry 


Wynne 




Page 










NINETY-TWO 




THE SKETCH CLUB 



®\)t g>fcetcf) Club 

Flowek: "Devil's Paint Brush Coeoks: Purple and Gold 

Motto: "Use Your Ounce" 

J* 

Miss Fenner Critic 

Josephine Rose President 

Van Cleve Wilkins Vice-President 

Sophie Egleston Secretary-Treasurer 

J* 

Bartholomew, E. Forbes, J. Newton, N. 

Cheatham, B. Hitohoooh, K. Rose, J. 

Dempsey L. Jeffreys, J. Newtok, N. 

Divine, S. Jones, D. Walters, M. 

Dougherty, D. Jordan, A. Wilkink, V. C. 

Egleston, S. Lowry. I. Womble, S. 
McMillan, J. 

NlNETY-TI-IRKE 



tEfje <Pan=!Hrd)on Council 

The Pan-Archon Council was organized tins vear under the leadership of 
Miss Turner. It is composed of the presidents of the various classes, and 
heads of the different organizations in school. The purpose "I* the council is to 
attain a greater degree of cooperation among the loader.-- of student activities. 
The members of the Pan-Archon Council are: 



,\I a ry Louise E v eb ett 
Lucy Lay 
Josephine Gould 
Mabel Hawkins 
Lucille Dempxey 
Susan Fitchette 



Jclia Winston Ashwohth 

Dorothy Nixon 
Jcsepiiine Rose 
Evelina Beckwitii 
Helen Budge 

Mar J OKIE WlLLARD 



Frances Hoskiks 



Wyt &eo Cross; 

The Saint Mary's auxiliary to the Raleigh chapter of the American Red 
Cross had again this year, as for three years preceding, a one hundred per cent 
membership in the school, oi faculty, officers anil students. The proceeds 

from "Stunt Night" were distributed by the officers of the lied Cross organi- 
zation in school. 

The executive committee of 11)21-22 is made up of: 

Lucille Dempsey. Chairman 

Helen Budge Secretary 

Muriel Dougherty Treasurer 

Lucy Lay ) 

; Workers 

Addle Huske | 

+ 



NlNETY-FOl.'K 




"The Spice of Life 



>> 



OTfcat ^ext! 



I thought I heard somebody say 

They had assembly one fine day — 
And Helen Powell wasn't late; 
And Whitehead sat in solemn state 
And didn't crack a smile! Oh fate, 
What Next ? 

And once somebody said to me, 
That Mr. Way's Theology 
Had come across a word or so 
That Mary Wiatt didn't know! 
And Elizabeth didn't argue, Oh! 
What Next ? 

And rumors strange are in the air: 
That Evelyn Way has bobbed her hair! 
"Chicago" studies hard as she can ! 
Betsy's furious with Anne! 
And Marcia doesn't speak to Van! 
What Next ? 

The age of "etiquette" has come — 
For Madge is seen without her gum ! 
A. B. Wilson's full of pep; 
Grace Barbour has an awful rep; 
And Louise Scott can't dance a step! 
What Next } 

Cheek takes music (oh my soul |, 
While Henlcel leads the Honor Roll! 
Miss Sutton says she hates the Mils, 
Miss Helen never pays her dues ! 
And everyone has overshoes! 
What Next ? 



L. A. E. 



Ninety five 







Jt 



Statistics; &f)pme 

Listen my children and you shall hear, 
A Song of St. Mary's and "who's who" up there. 
For the girls in that school are so fair and so fine 
You'll find all* you wish for in any good line. 
And knowing this fact they have chosen a date, 
And left in the hands of the hallot, the fate 
Of the witty and wise, of the famous and fair — 
And here's the result of "Statistics" this year ! 

Ruth Farr's the hest looking we know you'll agree ; 
While Dempsey's the cutest you ever did see — 
And Everett was voted the best-all-around, 
And besides she's the "Most Influential" we found. 
Mabel for beauty is famed far and wide; 
And Josephine- Rose is the most dignified; 
But Whitehead is not, so, by contrast she shined, 
For she's the most undignified we could find ! 

When it comes to "Scholarship" Yarborough's name, 
As leading the Honor Roll goes down in fame, 
Elise Ballard is lovable ; Smythe has the wit ; 
While Lotvry and Scott in the dance make a hit. 
M. L. Collier's a peach, "Most Attractive" is she; 
M. Thompson is "Most Athletic" we see. 
E. McMultan we envy — of all of the rest 
We vote her most popular — isn't that best ? 



L. A. B. 



S"lNETY-KIX 







EVA McMULLAN 

"Most Popular" 



Lorraine Smythe 
"Wittiest" 



Mary Louise Everett 
"Most Influential" 
"Best All-round" 




Mary Wiatt Yarisoroit.ii 
"Best Student" 



Ruth Farr 
•■Best Looking" 



Blise Ballari) 
"Host Lovable" 




Mabel Hawkins 
"Prettiest" 



Mary Louise Collier 
"Most Attractive" 



Josephine Rose 

"Most Dignified" 

Margaret Whitehead 

"Most Undignified" 







IsEIIELLA LOWRY 

Louise Scott 

"Best Dancers" 



Minette Thompson 
"Most Athletic" 



Ll'OILE Dempsey 
"Cutest" 






Eljc |3es£imtSt 

(With profuse apologies In Jim King) 

.Nothing tii eat but hash ; 
Nothing tn ili'ink lint tea ; 
Nothing tu i]u Init study hard— 
From French to A-l!-( '. 

Nowhere. to walk but the grove; 
Nothing to dance with but girls; 
Nothing to love but photographs; 
Nothing to string hut pearls! 

Nothing to wear but shoes — 
High anil ugly and brown ; 
Nowhere to go but church 
Ox "chaperoned" up to town ! 

Nothing to buy hut fruit 
When we go tu the little store; 
Nothing lint letters to read; 
( And never a box any more. ) 

Nobody to see us hut girls 
When we put on our pretty clothes; 
Nobody else hut a St. Mary's girl 
Could ever withstand these woes! 




One Hundred One 




CLASS PARTY "SNAPS" 



One Hundred Two 









8 Creefci 



Judging from the conversation of the average St. Mary's girl: 
I BELIEVE 

(1) That she could have a date everj Saturday night if she did not prefer to 
go to the basketball games. 

(2) That she lias a lover at Chapel Hill, one at A. &: E., ami at least three at 
home. 

( ■'! ) That she never gets up before 7 :_!!i A. M. 

(4) That she spends the night out of her room at least once a week. 

(5) That she wouldn't be afraid to smoke (if she took the notion. ) 
( (i ) That she never cracks a book. 

(7) That she does nothing but write letters in .Mr. Stone's classes. 

(8) That she isn't at all shocked at anything she reads in the Tar Baby, Punch 
Bowl, or Mink. 

( '.) ) That she hasn't any high shoes and overshoes ami doesn't intend to get any. 
( 1(1 ) That she really wasn't sick those two extra days she stayed home after Xmas 
Holidays but merely attending the New Year dances — 

In other words that she is a "flapper" — very much worse than we bad at 
first imagined. 

L. A. E. 



€xtra! 

KEMEMBEE ?— 

The day we heard we could visit during the spring holidays! 

The day Miss Morgan gave the honor roll a banquet ! 

The day we began going to the little store unchaperoned ! 

The day of Evelyn's birthday party which began at 1.0:30 I'. M. ! 

The day we first bad dates in the parlor! 

The day the Yarborough Orchestra played at the Sophomores' party! 

One Hundred Three 



E. H. 







Apt Quotations. 

"Delays have dangerous ends." — Going to Breakfast. 
"Bring me no more reports." — Helen Powell. 
"A rare bird on earth."- Whitehead. 

"Infinite riches in a little room." — Mary Louise 'in, I Martha. 
"Wlio goeth a-horrowing, goeth a-sorrowins;." Anybody. 
"Her siiuly was Inn little on the Bible. " — Thursday Mornings. 
"For lit iii»- niori likes to hear herself converse." .1/. T. Everett 
"Oh, sin will sing the savageness mil of a bear." — Midge. 
"Reproof on her lip, but a smile in her ryes." — Miss Morgan. 
"Which I have earned from the sweat of my brow."- Seventy mi Miss Mor- 
gan s Psychology. 

"Get money; still get money, boy, no matter by whal means." Budge mi 

Pay I )n ii . 

"And n rn sir down to thai nourishment which is called supper." — Sunday 
Nights. 

"I must I" me a borrower of the night, for a dark hour or twain." — Before 

Exams. 

"One hurried kiss, one last, one long embrace, one yearning look upon her 
tender face."- - ( 'rushes. 

"I have n passion For the name of 'Mary', for once ii was a magic sound to 
me." — Lenove Powell and Louise Enleslon. 

"Langh at ymir friends and if your friends are sore, so much the better 
ynii may laugh the more." — Mary Wiatt. 

lis the voice oi the sluggard I heard her complain, 'you have waked me 
too soon- 1 must slumber again'." — Muriel and Lenore ul ', :15 . 1 . .1/. 

One Hundred Fouls 












' 




One Hundred Five 



Jf acultp bulletin 

Miss Frances Bottum 

became very vexed with her class which had been doing such poor class and labora- 
tory experiments lately, and 

Blew Up 

several of the girls yesterday before they left 

The Laboratory. 

•■« 

Miss Bertha A. Morgan 

who feels, very strongly on the subject says that any girl who 

Rolls Her Stockings 

will be restricted and confined to the grove for two weeks 

Winter or Summer. 



Miss Moorefield 

very proud of her class says that nohody here ever 

Flunks On Algebra. 



Mr. Way Tells 

us that we will have a visitor soon who will tell us 

Some New Jokes 

and show us some interesting pictures next 

Thursday Night. 

One Hundred Six 









Miss Katie 

strongly disapproves of any young lady who willfully 

Chews Gum 

anywhere on St. Mary's Campus except 

In The Gym. 



Miss Davis 

reprimanded a pupil severely because she 

Broke Down 

and forgot her piece Thursday afternoon 

Iii a Recital. 



Mr. Jones 

lectured one of his pupils at a lesson because she 

Continually Plays Jazz 

and will not practice exercises to play 

In His Studio. 



Miss Turner 

is very decidedly NOT in favor of any one who listens to or 

Teaches Slang 

and expressed herself very emphatically on the subject 












In English N. 

L. A. E. 
One Hundred Seven 







.SCHOOL "SNAPS' 



One Hundred Eight 









M. iHarp'8 alphabet 



A's for assembly — we have every day! 

But A's for the Annual, the Muse board 
would say. 

B 's for basketball — get in the game. 

You may come out alive, but you won't 
look the same. 

C is for chapel caps, car fare and Crushes, 

A glimpse of the last brings us tremors 
and blushes. 

I) s for "DETENTION"— most terrible 
fate, 

But on Saturday night D means only a 
"date." 

E 's for Exams — when they come twice a 
year, 

Our head's full of nothing — our heart's 
full of fear. 

F is for French and for Friday and fish, 

That they'd not come so often, sincerely 
we wish. 

ii is for gym and geometry too 

You just guess which we like — we will 
leave it to you. 

H is for Hash — a most savory thing, 

And also for holidays — Christmas and 
Spring. 

I is for invites to dinner in town, 

But your hostess, my dear, on your list 
must be down. 

J is for joy — the kind that is spread. 

On third floor "Main" before going to 
bed. 

K is for kisses — to crushes most dear, 

When they're telling each other good 
night on the stair. 

L is for letters for me and for you, 

With all kinds of sweet things and 
checks maybe, too. 

M is for Miss Morgan, and Monday and Mu 

And music and money and Main Build- 
ing too. 

N is for nights when we've nothing to do, 

And also for "nuts" — and we know 

quite a few. 



O is for overshoes— worn in the snow, 

We got 'em for ninety-eight cents don't 
you know. 

1* is for powder and also for paint, 

They help little girlies to be what they 
ain't. 

Q is for quiet — that's just what we all 

Try hard to preserve as we go through 
the hall. 

K is for rouge, and too much on your 
cheek. 

Makes an "R" for restriction the very 
next week. 

S is for "Sweet William" of History fame, 
And it also means Sigma — a jolly good 



T for the Tuckers, they're line one and 
all. 

And tennis and teachers and telephone 
calls. 

l T is for umbrellas— nobody's got 'em, 

And lots of "unheard-of-things" known 
to Miss Bottum. 

V is for volleyball, played every day, 
And also Vacation that's coming in May. 

W*s for Whitehead — she shoots quite a 
line. 

And hears from cute sailors, fourteen 
at a time. 

X is for exercise — marked on a chart, 

To avoid restriction you must do your 
part. 

V is for yells that are heard at a game. 

From the Sigmas and Mus when the 
score is the same. 

Z is for zero — a mark very rare, 

For who ever heard of us failing up 
here? 

"Etc." is all of the things we don't know. 
And I guess they would till up a volume 



L. A. E. 



One Hundred Nine 







One Hundred Te:n 









Little d^rphant ^replet 

(With all due apologies to James W. Riley) 



Miss Bertha A. Morgan has come to school to stay, 

She chases up the chapel caps and scares the rouge away; 

She takes the canned food from our rooms, and throws away our gum. 

And watches us with .sharpest eye, and tries to stop our fun; 

And all we bad school children, gather 'bout her after school, 

And listen just as quiet as mice to many and many a rule, 
On rubbers, gloves and other things she tells us all about; 
And Miss Morgan's goin' ter get yon 

if 
you 
don't 
watch 
out! 




Once there was a little girl who wouldn't wear her spats. 

Miss Morgan sent her back upstairs among the mice and rats; 

Her room-mate heard her slam her trunk, her best friend heard her call, 

But when they went to look for her she wasn't there at all! 

They searched her through the closet, (which was in an awful mess). 

They searched for her in both the Wings and everywhere's, I guess, 

But all they ever found was just her spats and round-about 
And Miss Martian's goin' ter get you. 




k\W 



If 



you 
don 



t 

atch 

out! 



Once there was a little girl who liked to talk and grin, 

And on her way to chapel she committed this grave sin; 

They told her she had better hush, she didn't heed at all, 

But said she'd do just like she pleased and walked on down the hall, 

Miss Bottum heard her laughing and Miss Morgan heard her talk, 

Miss Morgan said in angry tones "I'll teach, you how to walk"! 

She snatched her out of chapel line and whirled her round about, 
And Miss Morgan's goin' ter get you, 

If 
you 
'*n ~y ^""l don't 

f^'^^S^^^y watch 

1 — i r~ ou tt 





So you'd better Mind your rector and your teachers fond and dear; 
And you'd better learn your lessons and do your best all year; 
You'd better keep your wits with you and know what you're about, 
'Cause Miss Morgan's goin' ter get t/mt. 

If 
you 
don't 
watch 
out! 



Mii.l 






One Hundred Eleven 




*A M ON G. M R S E LVE S r r £ £ $• 







._■! 



&fje Calenbar, 1921=22 



Sr/itonhcr /.'•/'/, Tuesday, Wednesday: Opening days of the 80th Annual Session. 
Arrival of new girls Tuesday; return of old girls Wednesday; forma] opening of 
school Thursday Morning. 

September 11, SaUirday : Opening reception, Old Girls to New Girls in the "Parlor" 
Smedes Hall. 

September ."/. Saturday: Joint reception by the Sigma Lambdas and B. A. P's to the 
new members in the "Parlor." 

October s. Saturday: "Miss Lulu Bett" at the Academy of Music. 

October /■». Saturday: "Bloomer Party" in the Gym. Mus victorious. 

October t!)-20, Wednesday and Thursday: Holidays; State Fair. Crtrolina-N. C. State 
Football Game. 

October 29, Saturday: Class Parties. Seniors to Sophomores in the "Parlor," Juniors to 
Freshmen in the "Lobby" and Preps, in the Gym. 

October -M. Monday: Hallowe'en Ball in the Gymnasium, led by .Mary Louise Collier 
and Isabella Lowry as Pierot and Pierette. 

November 2, Wednesday: Founder's Day. Joint Literary Society Program. 

November 3, Thursday: Riccardo Martin. 

November 7. Monday: Faculty recital. 

November 10, Thursday: "Thursday Talk" by Mr. Burton A. Konkle. 

November /..'. Saturday: First basketball games of the season. First and Third Teams. 
Mus victorious First Team game. Sigmas victorious Third Team. 

November 19, Saturday: Basketball, Second Team. Sigmas victorious. 

November .!), Thursday: Thanksgiving Day Special Service. Seniors see the Carolina- 
Virginia Football game at Chapel Hill. 

December 3, Saturday: Basketball, First and Third Teams, Sigmas victorious. 

December UK Saturday: Basketball. Second Team. Mus victorious. 



One Hundred Twelve 



December 13, 15, Tuesday and Thursday: Model meetings of The Sigma Lambda and 
E. A. P. Literary Societies, won by the E. A. P's. 

December 10, Friday Evening: Dramatic Club under direction of Miss Davis presents 
"Daddy Long Legs" in the Auditorium. 

December 17, Saturday: "Merry Christmas, Santy" written by Louise Egleston, pre- 
sented by the Seniors in the Auditorium at 8:00 followed by the Christmas Tree Enter- 
tainment in the Gym. 

December 1!>, Monday: Christmas Carols sung by the Seniors early in the morning. 
Departure for the holidays. 

January: School duties resumed after the holidays. 

January 9, Monday: Rachmaninoff Concert, Raleigh Auditorium. 

January lJ t , Saturday: Basketball First and Third Teams, Mu First Team victorious. 
Sigma Third Team victorious. 

January 16-19, Monday-Thursday: Mid-term examinations. 

January 19, Thursday : Mr. Bowen, the magician, performed in the Study Hall. 

January 23, Monday: D'Alvarez Concert, Raleigh Auditorium. 

January 2(1, Thursday : Mrs. Josephus Daniels talks about Wilson Foundation Fund 
in the Study Hall. 

January 2,s, Saturday: Basketball, Second Team, Sigmas victorious, 

February (>, Monday: Cabaret by St. Margaret's Chapter in the Gym. from 5:00 to 6:00. 

February IS, Monday: Anna Case in the Auditorium. 

February Hi, Thursday: Illustrated lecture by Mr. Blair. 

February 18, Saturday: Return of school parties. Sophomores to Seniors in the "Par- 
lor" with an orchestra, and Freshmen to Juniors in the "Lobby." Preps in the Gym. 

February 20, Monday: "Ma Sweet and Her Gurrls" presented by the St. Agnes Chapter 
in the "Parlor." Lorraine Smythe as "Ma." 

February 22, Wednesday: Freida Hempel Jenny Lind Concert in the Auditorium. 

February 2.1, Thursday: Talk by Miss Cooper. 

February 25, Saturday: Stunt Night in the Auditorium. 

February 27, Monday: Sousa's Band. 

February 28, Tuesday: Colonial Ball in the Gym led by Betsy Ballou and Anne Jordan. 

March 1, Wednesday: Ash Wednesday. 

March 1-April Hi: Lenten Quiet. Lenten services Wednesday and Friday afternoons 
in the Chapel. Special work of all the Church School Service League Chapters. Mis- 
sion Study Classes on Sunday evenings. 

March S-10, Wednesday-Friday: Model meetings of the Sigma Lambda and E. A. P. 
Literary Societies. Won by the Sigma Lambdas. 

March 11, Saturday: Volley ball games, Sigma First Team victorious and Mu Second 
Team victorious. 

One Hundred Thirteen 



March 12, Sunday: "Living Pictures" in the Art Studio given by the Sketch Club under 
the direction of Miss Fenner. 

March 15, Wednesday : Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra. 

March W-.il: Spring holidays. 

March 25, Saturday: Volley ball. 

March .ill, Thursday: Cup program. 

A /nil .''. Sunday: Palm Sunday. Confirmation in the afternoon. 

April hi. Sunday: Easter Sunday: Service at S:00 A. M., 11:110 A. M. and 5:00 P. M. 

April .;2, Saturday: Piano Recital of Miss Louise Egleston assisted by Miss Evelina 
Beckwith. 

April !■'■. Sunday: Miss Bessie Blacknall told us about the "Mission work in Alaska" 
in the parlor. 

April 2!>. Saturday: "Expression Recital of Lorraine Smythe, assisted by Louise Egleston. 

May I. Monday: Spring Athletic Meet at 3:00 P. M., Sigmas victorious. Expression 
Recital of Daisy Cooper, assisted by Marjorie Page at 8:15 P. M. 

Mail .;. Wednesday: At 4:00 P. M., Recital by Miss Abbott assisted by Miss Weeks. 

May '/. Thursday: Choir Dinner in the side grove. 

Mail H, Saturday: Annual Junior-Senior Banquet. 

Mail S, Monday: Annual Inter-Society Debate. 

May /■'•■ Saturday: Annual School parly in the Parlor. 

May 15, Monday: The comic opera. Mikado presented by the Chorus Club. 

May 20, Saturday Evening: Dramatic Club under direction of Miss Davis presents 
"As You Like It." 

May 21. Sunday: Commencement Sunday Baccalaureate Sermon delivered by Bishop 
Thomas C. Darst of East Carolina. 

May 22, Monday: 11:00 A. M. Class Day Exercises in the grove; Art Exhibit in the 
Studio; Annual Concert of the Music Department; Rector's Reception to the Alumnae 
and Visitors in Honor of the Graduating Class. 

May 23, Tuesday: 11:00 A. M. Commencement Day. Graduating Program in the Audi- 
torium with the annual address delivered by Dr. Howard E. Rondthaler. Awards, an- 
nouncements. Final exercises in the Chapel with presentation of the Diplomas to the 
graduates. 



£ 



One Hundred Fourteen 



©ap pp Bap 



One bright day in last September, 
When the train putted into Raleigh, 
Might be seen a crowd of school-girls 
Looking blankly round the Station,- — 
New ones, old ones, waiting tor him, — 
Him who always took their trunk checks, 
Him whom some have called "Sweet 

William!" 
Then he came and took his charges, 
Laughing, gaily-chatting school-girls; 
Took them "home" to old St. Mary's — 
"Home" to them for eight months coming. 
Then there came a week of heart aches, 
Bitter tears and homesick letters, 
Common fate of every school girl. 
This gave way to days of study, 
Dancing, parties, fun and friendships; 
First the old girls' big reception 
Came to cheer the homesick new ones; 
Next the Miis and Sigmas rallied, 
Chose their girls and had their party 
In the gym- — their "Bloomer Party" 
Annual start for all athletics! 
Then the literary societies — 
E. A. P. and Sigma Lambda — 
Made a big reception for us. 
Welcome to their newest members! 
Hallowe'en with all its witches, 
All its ghosts and cats and broomsticks, 
Came to find the big gymnasium 
Filled with girls in gayest costumes 
Making merry with their partners! 
"Daddy Long Legs" in December, 
Just before we left for Christmas; 
And the "Merry Christmas, Santa" 



Given for us by the Seniors 
Sent us "on our way rejoicing" 
Home to find another Christmas. 
Back to those dread things of misery- 
Hard Exams! But soon were over — 
Parties for the classes followed 
Sophomore-Senior music featured! 
Followed then a "Stunt Nite" clever, 
Most amusing scenes from school life 
Then at last in February 
Came the best of all— the evening 
When the quaint, old-fashioned costume. 
Powdered hair and spreading hoop-skirts, 
Stately minuet and waltzes 
Made the gym a scene of splendor! 
Home for spring- vacation going 
Back again in time for Easter. 
Thick and fast recitals followed, 
Each young artist most successful! 
Junior-Senior Banquet royal. 
Followed by the dear school party; 
Caps and gowns on Solemn Seniors. 
Next the chorus gave "Mikado" 
Dainty Japs in gay kimonos. 
Then commencement exercises: 
"As You Like It" first attraction; 
Then the thrills of Senior Class Day; 
Last recital; then on Tuesday, 
Standing in the little chapel 
For our own hard-earned diplomas! 
That is all, the year is over— 
All its cares and joys are over! 
But we keep in Memory's Storehouse 
All the names and faces dearest. 
All our love to you St. Mary's! 



<3 



One Hundred Fifteen 



< )li. Senior, did you ever : 
Come to St. Mary's — a new girl; 

And fee I as if you'd lost 
Your last friend : 

And weep ynur eyes out 
For home and -Mamma ; 

Ami think nobody loved you, 
Or eared if yon died ; 

And all of a sudden one night 
Have a Senior come to sec you, 

And kiss you goodnight, 
And ask yon if you had any letters 

She could mail for yon ; 
And want yon to come to see her? 

( )h Senior — 
Ain't it a grand and glorious feeling? 

< )h. Senior, did you ever : 

Fly to the postoffiee at 6:25 P. M. — 

And find your box empty ! 
And then wend your way slowly 

To the dining 1 in. 

With a sail heart and lone; face 

Because you thought 
You didn't have any mail '. 

And then find at your place 
A letter, a check and a package, 

Which some other kind Senior 
Had had the kindness to get? 

* Mi Senior — 
Ain't it a grand and glorious feeling '. 

( )h. Senior, did you ever : 
Have your name read in assembly, 

And hear a request for you to see 
The lady principal after lunch 

And spend a miserable morning, 
Thinking you were going to he restricted 

Because you remembered that 
^ on chewed gum in gym class, 

Or borrowed your room-mate's hat, 
( lr talked in chapel line. 

And then report after lunch 
And have the lady ask you 

To serve at her faculty tea 
That very afternoon '. 
( Mi Senior — 
Ain't it a "rand and glorious feeling? 








One HrNriRF.n Sixteen 






Oh, Senior, did you ever: 
Wake up in the morning 

When the thermometer was low ; 
And the wind whistled round the COl'll' 

And your bed was snug and warm; 
And you wanted so much to sleep, 

lint you saw by the little alarm (dock 
That it was seven o'clock 

And listened to hear the rising bell 
And all of a sudden realized thai 

1 1 was Sunday morning 
And you had another hour to sleep '. 

< Hi Senior — 
Ain't it a grand and glorious feeling? 




Oh, Senior, did yon ever: 
Find yourself one day in May 

With a light happy heart. 
And the knowledge that all your exams 

And troubles are over. 
Standing in the chape] 

Jn a snow white organdie. 
With the sun streaming through the windows, 

And the words of the Baccalaureate Ser n 

Floating nut en the warm breeze: 

And the < 'heir singing 
"Jerusalem High Tower;" 

' And have your diploma given yen 
To have and to hold. 

And a moment later in the grove — 
See the Chief Marshal standing 

I nder an arch of roses 
And raise her hands for silence 

To say, "School is Dismissed" ( 
< >h Senior — 
AIN'T IT A GKAND A X I ) GLOKIOF/S FEELING? 




L. A. E. 



25 






One Hundred Seventeen 






XETfje Annual JffluSe ^Boaro, 1921=22 

Helen Porter Budge, '22, Chairman and Business Manager 

Louise Egleston, '22 Editors Lenore Powell, '22 

Josephine Forbes. '22, .lr,/ Editor 



I (aisv ( 'oui'Ki;, '23 
Lucile DEMPSEYj '23 
Elizabeth Hickerson. '23 



Assistant Editors 

Julia Winston Ashwokth, '22. 
Muriel I Iougherty, '22 
Kitty Lei: Frazier. '22 



Miss Sara C. Turner, Faculty Adviser 



trials of tije JtluSe poarb 

When group pictures have to be taken, and il rains three successive Mondays 
— well, it's troublesome! 

Winn Winkie goes out to take snaps from the class parties, and the whole 
school congregates to see the Sheik and Diana pose — well, it's troublesome! 

When, after contracts have been made for only about lialf of our desired 
advertisements, a law is passed prohibiting advertisements except in Weeklies 
and Monthlies — well, it's troublesome ! 

When, after all these years of going calmly alone to Mr. Horton's a ueir rule 
comes into being that one must be chaperoned, and we have to hunt high and 
low all over school for chaperons for the "statistics" and "certificate" girls — 
well, it's troublesome ! 

When, in the very midst of strenuous work on the dummy, James appears 
on the scene — well, it's downright irritating! 



One Hundreu Eighteen 







One Hundred Nineteen 



To you, dear schoolmates, one and all — 

Hoping we may herein recall 

Ever the host of the school year's fun, 

Each bright day of the year that's done- 
New iii lis, old girls we grant a look, 
Deny mir genius! — but take the book! 




/^ TaLe f eT&td 



One Hundred Twknty 










Ans 






I 



The Bland Hotel 



j V. ST. CLOUD, Manager 



RALEIGH. N. C. 



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IDENTIFY YOURSELF 

RENT A 

NEW FORD 

: AND : 

DRIVE IT YOURSELF 

SORRELL'S 

GARAGE 

400 S. .SALISBURY ST. RALEIGH 



OPEN DAY AXD NIGHT 



! Motor Service Co. ! ! 



of RALEIGH, Inc 



Accessories - Repairs 



310-312 S. Salisbury Street 
RALEIGH, N. C. 



Plmur .1119 Bell 



Sanitary Plumbers, Steam Filters 

105 S. Wilmington Street 
Raleigh. N. C. 






YOUNG & HUGHES i 

j 



j LET US SELL YOU YOUR 
I FURNITURE and STOVES 



j The Raleigh Furniture Co. 

I 119-121 E. Hargett Street 

) T. E. GREEN, 

) Secretary - Treasurer 



I 



I 



Peacock Alley 
Tea Room 

12^2 E. Hargett Street 
Raleigh, N. C. 



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! Mills Tire Company | I Johnson Coal and 

11 DEALERS IN 

I AUTOMOBILES - 



TIRES 
ACCESSORIES 

Comer Wilmington & Davie Sts. 
Raleigh, North Carolina 



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Ice Company 

09 W. MARTIN ST. 



I j Coal! Wood! Ice! Brick! ! 



PHONE 437 



ALLEN BROTHERS 

REAL ESTATE 

FARMS — CITY— SUBURBAN PROPERTY 

AUCTION AND PRIVATE SALES 

SALES AGENTS FOR HAYES-BARTON LOTS 



8 WEST MARTIN STREET 



Raleigh, N. C. 



COVERING HIS BEAT 
"Why do you gaze at my nose," she said, 

"you impertinent, rude, little pup?" 
"'Cause I'm a reporter, kind lady," he said, 
"And I always take notice of things that 
turn up." — Tar Baby. 



Traveller: "Close that window — it's cold 
outside." 

Next Seat Occupant: "Do you think it 
will be warmer outside if I close it?"— 
Life. 

4 



BEGINNING EARLY 
Little Girl: "Mother, when I get to hea- 
ven, will I play with the little angels?" 
Mother: "Yes, darling, you will." 
Little Girl: "And don't you fink, mother, 
if I'm very, very dood, they will let me 
play with a lickle devil sometimes?" — 
Wayside Tales. 



A SMALL ANACHRONIST 

The youngster who asked his father why 
God hadn't given the zebra stars as well 
as stripes has a match in the little girl 
who wrote this description of the Ark: 

"Overhead was a gorgeous rainbow and be- 
neath it the little Ark rode proudly over 
the waters, with smoke pouring from her 
smokestack and the United States flag 
flying at the bow." — Boston Transcript. 



WHAT SHE DREADED 
Vicar: "All sinners, Mary, will be truly 

whiter than snow." 
Old Beggar Woman: "Not them as truly 

repents, I 'opes, sir. — Boston Transcript. 



Joyce: "Why do you call this the wonder 
car?" 

Rovce: "It's a wonder it runs." — Tar Baby. 



C. C. GUNN &? COMPANY 

LADIES AND MISSES 

HICH CLASS READY-TO-WEAR 

AT 

POPULAR PRICES 



122 Favetteville Street 



Raleigh, N. C. 



j Cook with Gas 



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ind 



Sleep An Hour Later 

Meals Always On Time 

! RANGES SOLD ON 

j MONTHLY PAYMENTS 8 



I Carolina Power & j 

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Light Company j 



GAS DIVISION 



j Pho 



1376 



RALEIGH, N. C. 



THE SLEUTH AT WORK 

The detective sat in a corner of the .sta- 
tion house exclaiming, "He's a thief, a 
scoundrel, a blackleg — ' 

"Less noise there," said the sergeant, 
"what are you doing?" 

"Why, I'm running down a criminal."— 
Boston Transcript. 



£ 



THE SPARTAN MISS. 
Nurse (returning from juvenile party): 

Good gracious, Betty, how sticky your 

gloves are! 
Betty: "So would yours be, if you had 

two meringues and a chocolate eclair in 

your muff. — Passing Show (London). 



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j GOODWIN-SMITH ! 



FURNITURE CO. 

CASH IF YOU HAVE IT 
CREDIT IF YOU WANT IT 

124 EAST MARTIN ST. 

RALEIGH. N. C. 



Royal Baking Co. 

THE ELECTRIC BAKERY- 
QUALITY -NOT QUANTITY 
109 South Wilmington St. 

Raleigh, North Carolina 



DID YOU KNOW: (?) 
That Miss Moorefield is an MA.' 
That Mr. Stone's class at Harvard is going 

to have a reunion? 
That Mam'selle Ballon has studied at Johns- 
Hopkins? 
That Miss Fenner lias been abroad seven 

times? 
That Muriel's Maynard is abroad? 



Prosi-i: "Who made this fancy ink well?" 

Soph: "Search me, I didn't even know if 
was sick." — Tttr Halm. 



I Horton's Studio j 

i 

■ Masonic Iemple Building I 

I 

, THE VERY BEST WORK 

, IN PHOTOGRAPHY ! 

! 



| | Official Photographer 

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j j THE MUSE 

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DUNN -THOMPSON 

WHOLESALE GROCERS 



311 WEST MARTIN STREET 



RALEIGH. N. C. 



YOU CAN ALWAYS 

DO BETTER AT 

Kline & Lazarus 

THE BIG 
BUSY THRIFT STORE 



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CALL 538 FOR 



Transfe 



arren s l ransrer 



Baggage Transfer and Auto- 
mobiles Fur Hire 



DAY 



AND 



NIGHT 



| POWELL'S J i 

j Walk-over Boot Shop j j 
j LADIES' FINE SHOES j j 



AND HOSIERY 

RALEIGH. N. C. 



Hicks Crabtree Co. j 

(3) FIRST CLASS j 

DRUG STORES ! 



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I j ALL ON FAYETTEVILLE ST. 

j i 



THE SHOPPING CENTER 

BOYLAN-PEARCE 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

LADIES' READY-TO-WEAR, MILLINERY. DRY GOODS 
AND FLOOR COVERINGS 



M. A. RUSHTON 

RALEIGH. N. C. 
All Open Modds $1775 - - Closed Models $2400 to $2500 

THE KING 8 

"THE CAR OF XO REGRETS" 



KALEIGH FRENCH DRY CLEANING I 1 

AND DYEING COMPANY 
"CLEANERS THAT CLEAN" 
Office. 333 Fayetteville Street 

Plant: 414-416 Gale Street 
Bell Phone: 781 Raleish Phone: 395 



HUMOROUS CLOTHES 

"] can't 1 1 1 1 d any old clothes Cor my scare- 
crow," said the farmer. 

"1'se some of the fancy things the boy 
brought home from college," replied his 
wife. 

"I'm trying to scare crows, not make them 
laugh."- Judge. 



GEO MARSH, President 
T. A. WILLIAMS, Secretary 

B. B. BENSON. V.-Pres. & Treasure 

Geo. Marsh Co., Inc. 

WH( JLESALE GROCERS 

125 EAST MARTIN ST. 

Raleigh, North Carolina 



j The Yarborough j 

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j B. H. GRIFFIN HOTEL CO. j 



B. H. GRIFFIN President 



RALEIGH, N. C. 



I 



A CALIFORNIA MAID 
A lady stopping at a hotel on the Pacific 

coast rang the bell the first morning of 

her arrival, and was very much surprised 

when a Japanese boy opened the door 

and came in. 
"I pushed the button three times for a 

maid.'' she said sternly, as she dived 

under the covers. 
"Yes," the little fellow replied. "Me she."— 

San Francisco Chronicle. 



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STAUDT'S BAKERY 

If You Want Quality Ask For 
"My Mother's Bread" 



SOUTHERN SCHOOL SUPPLY 
COMPANY 



"The best <>i everything for schools" 
RALEIGH - NORTH CAROLINA 



T. B. MOSELY, President 

H. A. BLAND. Secretary-Treasurer 

Mosely - Bland Co. 

REAL ESTATE AND 

INSURANCE 

IS WEST MARTIN ST. 
RALEIGH, N. C. 



HIS AMATEUR STANDING 

The Plutocrat (to would-be son-in-law): 
"Is it my daughter you want, sir, or is it 
her money?" 

The Suitor: "Sir, you know very well that 
I am an amateur athlete." 

The Plutocrat: "What's that got to do 
with it?" 

Tin; Suitor: "A great deal, sir. It debars 
me from taking part in any event for 
money!" — Passing Show (.London). 




STEVENS-DURYEA 

If knowledge ever comes to you of the comfort, style, 
permanence and smoothness of Stevens-Duryea you 
will own one. 

FROM $6800 TO $12000 

J. R. NORRIS 

S TA TE D/S TRIB I ' TOR 
2 E. DAVIE STREET RALEIGH, N. C. 



THEN ADAM FELL 

Willie (aged eight): "O, Elsie, I know a 
fine game. Let's pretend we're Adam and 
Eve." 

Elsie (aged six): "Oh, yeth; but just wait 
till I finish eating my apple." — Life. 



LIMITED 

First Visitor: "Ring up Central and ask 
them which is the taller — the Woolworth 
Building or the Metropolitan Tower." 

Second Visitor: "What for?'' 

"Well, we haven't time to see both," — Life. 



Telephone 74 

WE TREAT YOUR 

CLOTHES RIGHT 

Capital City Laundry 

1I5 1 •■ W. MARTIN STREET 
IISIT0RS ALWAYS WELCOME 



I 



j$ c mtxu- & 




Exclusive Millinery 
Artistic Designing 



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H.S. STORRCO. I 



EVERYTHING FOR 

THE OFFICE 



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THAT'S ALL \ 
j 



Miss Morgan: "Mary Louise, what is your 
excuse for walking out of choir practice 
last night?" 

"Babe" Collier: "Why Miss Morgan, Mr. 
Jones was looking the other way." 



RALEIGH, N. C. 



SAME HERE 




Alfred: "Have you traveled much?' 




Albert: "I've been in every country 
world." 


in the 


Alfred: "How do you like Turkey?' 




Albert: "Willi cranberry sauce. 
Baby. 


•—Tar 


Mr. Stone (reading an article): 
should be interesting to my day 


"This 
pupils 



back there, who are talking." 
K. L. : "I beg your pardon, Mr. Stone, it is 

interesting, but my mind wandered for 

a moment." 
Mr, Stunk; "Well, don't lei it wander iO I 

can hear it." 



HELLER BROS. 



I 



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j SHOES - HOSIERY j 



RALEIGH, N. C. 



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Miss Morgan: "Emily, why were you late 
to class? Didn't you hear the hell?" 

E. Haiu.ow: "Yes'ni. but you told me not to 
believe all 1 heard." 



A Real 
Paint Store 

Complete Stock 
of Paints for all 
purposes. Also 
Varnishes, Stains, 
Enamels, Shellacs 
Oils, Artists Mat- 
erials, Brushes, 
Etc. 

LARGE STOCK OF MANTELS. TILE 
AND CRATES 

We have our own mechanics to install fly 
screens and metal weatherstrips. 

McDonald 

Paint & Specialty Co. 
Paint Contractors 




j WALKER ELECTRIC COMPANY j 

| 110 WEST MARTIN STREET I 

I WANT TO SERVE YOU j 

j PHONE: 1155 RALEIGH, N. C. j 



FOR EVERYTHING THAT IS KEPT 
' IN AN UP-TO-DATE DRUG STORE 

First Drunken Max: "What was that that I { 

just went by?" j SKE us F[RST j 

Second Drunken Man: "Streeth car." I { 

First Drunken Man : "How do you know?" " OOOII-IscIgV L/TU2 C-^O. 
Second Drunken Man: "I see the tracks." 

j Phones 95 and SS44 \ 

Raleigh, N. C. j 



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! Hudson-Belk Co. ! 



i Raleigh's Largest Department Store j 

! ! 

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I Fayetteville, Martin and Wilmington Streets j 

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! 

\ MISSES REESE CO. i 

I I NOMENCLATURE 

I Fine Millinery ' " All our gowns have names. We call tliis 

) ' model the Banana Peel." 

I 109 Fayetteville Street !l .'Fits closely'" 

I ! 

I "Kasv to slip on."- Judge. 

I Raleigh, N. C. 

I ! 



! Correct Apparel MSK^T 10% to j 

Wo.net Misses K38H§gSBB C*r CU. | 

women — i.viiss>es> ... .....i^T^i"-'--^......, | 



Dillon Supply Co. 

The Mill Supply House 
Phone 753 

Raleigh, N. C. 



■'•> Mu. Stone (on history class): "An English 

j king that couldn't speak French fell in 

i love with a French queen that couldn't 

* do the reverse." 

I M. Whitehead: "Perhaps they said it with- 

j out words!" 

! 

j Mary Louise Everett: "Miss Giddens, 

j where is the March Ladies Home Jour- 

■ naif— 

j Miss Giddens: "If it's not in the rack may 

j be it had run out." 

| Mary Louise Everett: "But Miss Giddens, 

..% when they run out where do they go?" 



DID THEY? WELL, I WONDER IE THEY DID! 

Miss ( rretshmer encourages her class in their difficult passages by suggesting 
rlii ■ constant use of the ever reliable pony. 

Whitehead is called down for her boisterous behavior at Miss Morgan's table. 

Miss Sutton greets the Monday morning mail line with beaming smiles, and 
tells the poor girls al the end thai the easiest way to get their mail in a hurry 
is to push ahead and go in the first door (thus creating her much loved con- 
fusion. ) 



IN THE MIST 

Prof, (concluding a difficult explanation): 
"Is that some one smoking back there?" 

Stude: "Not at all, sir, only the fog I'm 
in." — Lord Jeff. 

1 

DOINGS 

Spics "My fiance: insists that I obtain her a 
large bouquet for the dance tonight. Is 
it being done?" 

Scan: "No. you are." — Tiger. 




Carolina s , 

Largest Chain j 



One Price Department Store 

We Appreciate Your Patronage 

206-?08 Fayetteville Street 

Raleigh, N. C. 



i 



! I 



The Place To Meet Your Friend 



j Brantley's Drug Store j a Pine State Creamery 

) i 

I I MILK AND CREAM 

] ] ICE CREAM 

I I 

I j THAT IS MADE OF CREAM I 

! | ! 



OUR SODAS AND 

ICE CREAMS ARE 

ALWAYS BEST 8 



Phone 15 



RALEIGH, N. C. 



! Me. Stoke: "Miss Way answer the ques- 
■ tion please." 

| Class: "I know." 

j Mr. Stoke: "There is only one 'Way' in 
I this class." 

Whitehead: "Yes, the straight and narrow 
way." 



I 



RETORT COURTEOUS 
"What would you do if you were in my 

shoes?" 
"Get "em shined. That's what I'd do."— 

Panther. 

I knew a doctor and his name was Peck, 
Fell in the well and broke his neck. 
Serves him right, you all will own. 
For he auto tend the sick and leave the 

well alone. — Miss A. R. W., Mt. Holyokc, 

Mass 



LYNN WILDER 

Wholesale Grocer 

327-329 W. MARTIN STREET 
Raleigh, No^th Carolina 



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ARTISTIC PHOTOGRAPHY WITH 

THE QUALITY AND CHARM 

OF AN OLD ETCHING 



OMAR & VIRGINIA 

FOWLER 

PHOTOCRAFTSMAN 



2 1 ' _• Fayettcville Street 
Over GRANT'S 



j THE HIGHEST CLASS 

! Suits-Costumes-Dresses-Skirts and Waists 

! At The Lowest Price 

Is Our Success 

1 Taylor Furnishing- Company 

j 305-6-7-8-9-10 Masonic Temple 
j 



, : .._ ._.._„_.._.._._.__._.„._ ._..»_._ si j; »d you Kl jii g to see that little 

( . j brunette you wen! with last winter?" 

| Wm. Heller j f PH ■* ™ maTTi f ° ow -" , 

| | 3<irn 1: Answer me. — Punchbowl. 

" nni. _ c__«. ci ' ! ■** 



Yes, I was a freshman once. too. Some of 



, The Footery Shop ' 

124 Favetteville Street tlle nan £>iest years of my life were spent 

I I while I was a freshman. — Swanee Purple. 

Raleigh, N. C. j * * 

j j ! | A Mile From High Prices j 

A visitor asked little Billy several ques- ( *^ — I 

tions but received no reply. At last the IJ 

., ,.„. ., ,,, | BUY YOUR WATCHES 

grown up said: Wont you tell me your I 

name? I think it must be Billy Sunday." 



Billy pondered and at last replied: "No. 1 
isn't Billy Sunday. I'se Billy evy day." 



j DIAMONDS AND JEWELRY 

" 1 13 F a ye 1 1 ev i 1 1 e Street 



! j 

Darnell & Thomas Co., j 

North Carolina's Oldest Music House 

) Pianos, Player Pianos, Phonographs and Records j 

A Postal will bring Catalogue and Terms 

j 118 FAYETTEV1LLE ST. RALEIGH, N. C. j 

! i 



I : Stationery : 

" SPORTING GOODS 

| Founiam Pens-Kodaks-Loose Leaf 

' Note Books, Everything for 

1 ihe office. 

I Jas. E. Thiem 

I Bell Phone 135 Raleigh, N C 



! i ! 

I California Fruit Store ! 



I I I Fayetteville Street 



Best Ice Cream 
Fruit & Candies 



Miss Katie: "Marjorie Willard, you will 

have to put on rubbers before you go to 

the little store." 
M. W.: "But Miss Katie, I have on rubber 

heels!" 
Miss Katie: "Oh well, I suppose that will 

be all right." 



J. J. rallon Co. 

FLORISTS 

Successors to J. L. QUINN 

Yarborough Duildtng 



I Members of Florist Telegraphic Delivery ( 

! i 



: Ellington's Art Store | 



i 



Fine Picture Frame = 

and Novelties- Artists Supplies-Art 

Embroidery Materials 



i 
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j J. C ELLINGTON. RALEIGH. N C. I 

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THE DIFFERENCE 

Tom: "What's the difference between bet 
ting and bluffing?" 

Jack: "A good deal." — Yoo Doo. 



Bess: "Oh, dear, I'm afraid we'll miss the 
first act. We've waited a good many 
minutes already for my mother." 

John: "Hours, you mean." 

Bess: "Ours! Oh. John, this is so sudden." 
— Mixs It. V., Montevallo, Ala., in Tar 
Baby. 




SEAFOODS 

PHONE 80S 

14 E. Morgan Street 



Buy All You Need 
AT 

GILMERS 

//i the Heart of Raleigh 

Bell Phone 494 



Wright's Cafe 

Raleigh's Popular 
Eating Place 



Thos. N. Driggs & Sons 

Baseball Goods, Guns and 
Sporting Goods a Specialty 

THE BIG HARDWARE MEN 



I i 





RICHMOND MEAT MARKET 






L. Schwartz 








Dealer in Choice Meats 








SAUSAGE A SPECIALTY 






c 


ty Market Raleigh, 


N. 


C. 




P. 0. Box 354 







We Always Have The Very 
Newest Styles 

A mill aheadbul only a block away 

Sample Shoe Store 

2 IS S. Wilmington St. 



C. D. Arthur 

Headquarters for Sen foods 
of oil kinds 



Terms Cosh 



! i 



Phone 255 

Stall No. 



City Market 



CHA11LES LEE SMITH HOWELL L. SMITH \VM. OLIVER SMITH 
President Secretary Tnasurcr 



Edwards & Broughton 
Printing Company 

RALEIGH, N. C. 



Printers, Publishers, Stationers 

Steel and Copper Plate Engravers — Manufacturers of Blank Books 
and Loose Leaf Systems of all kinds 

Engraved Wedding Invitations and Announcements. Visiting Cards 
Fine Monogram Stationery 

THE ONLY COMPLETELY EQUIPPED STEEL 

DIE AND COPPER PLATE ENGRAVING PLANT 

IN NORTH CAROLINA 



High Class Printing 

Artistic Catalogs, Booklets, Menus, Invitations, Stationery 
HALFTONES AND ETCHINGS 



COR R E S PONDENCK INVITE D